Reframing Counseling & a Vicarious Counseling Approach (Conclusion)

Manila Bulletin, March 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

Reframing Counseling & a Vicarious Counseling Approach (Conclusion)


Byline: Rommel B. De La Cruz, Ed.D. Graduate School, Jose Rizal University

LET us now situate counseling in the classroom while considering it more as a process of helping and growing in the article "The Changing Context of Teacher Education in Larger Society,aa we teachers are admonished that our responsibility does not end in providing the young generation with knowledge and technical skills they need in meeting the challenges of an electronic and computer age. We also have to help them grow or mature by furnishing them life knowledge and skills. Life knowledge and skills are those variables we can associate with emotional and attitudinal quotients. Our local company technocrats sometimes ignore these quotients. With the speed knowledge and technology is progressing, only the basics of their education most of the time will be of help to those who are now employed. These basics will be enhanced by experience and training at work. Life knowledge and skills would make the difference whether such enhancement will either take place or not; or maybe take place slow or fast. A number of companies abroad particularly in the US do not consider much the degrees earned here; prime consideration is given to experience and skills.

The Commission on PreCollege Guidance and Counseling remarked that schools can contribute significantly in controlling the depletion of human resources and talent. We can find in our generation a huge number of people who could have contributed something to improve our way of life if they were only helped to attain their potentialities. These potentialities they can realize only in themselves if they have those life knowledge and skills. As almost proverbially echoed through countless instances, in the classroom is where the biggest war of the future of a people is fought. To win a war men have to go to battlegrounds with readiness to win battles, in the same manner, to save the future of a young generation, the older generation should secure first their youngas mental and emotional wellbeing before anything else.

I have developed a counseling approach which assimilates some features of their approaches. This counseling approach has been developed with the homeroom classroom in mind as its locale of deployment. It is also designed with consideration of the cross-sectional portrait of the Filipino. In other words, it considers our being self-centered, passive, and religious. This is the Vicarious Counseling Approach (VCA).

The "vicariousaa is strongly associated with education. Teachers may have been introduced to it through the names of observational learning, social learning and symbolic learning. A reviw of the research done on his type of learning shows that for some yeras it has delved into how cognition facilitates it. Later studies have associated it with other constructs which promote learning, e.g. observation, social interaction, modeling. Thus, we can easily underscore its theoretical harboring in social learning. The Dictionary of Personality and Social Psychology claims that social theory is an attempt to explain vicarious examples of human behavior and aspects of personality by reference to principles derived from experiments in learning.

Three strategies used in this approach have been identifiable with social learning theory. These are Simulation, Modeling, and Reinforcement. Simulation aims to work on the resources present in the student which can be helpful for the purpose of counseling. These resources come either in the form of experiences, feelings or thoughts. The strategy provides both the data to the counselor and awareness to the student and the situation that the latter perceives as impeding his growth. The advantages of this Vicarious Counseling strategy are varied. It can allow the student to experience the crisis and overcome it in the presence of a more helping climate. Learning and growing can unfold in an environment that relatively controls the consequence of the studentas actions. …

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