Charles Faces New Court Trial to Win Back His Journals; JUDGE REJECTS DEMAND FOR RETURN OF MANUSCRIPTS THAT REVEAL HIS VIEWS

Daily Mail (London), March 18, 2006 | Go to article overview

Charles Faces New Court Trial to Win Back His Journals; JUDGE REJECTS DEMAND FOR RETURN OF MANUSCRIPTS THAT REVEAL HIS VIEWS


Byline: REBECCA ENGLISH

PRINCE Charles could have to give evidence in court after being told he must fight on to get back his 'explosive' travel journals.

A judge yesterday rejected his demands for the immediate return of the seven controversial manuscripts and said the case would have to go to trial.

This means the prince could become the most senior royal in modern times to appear as a witness.

It is the latest stumbling block in a legal battle that has already led to a number of revelations about the prince's views.

The most damaging were made by his former aide Mark Bolland, who accused the heir to the throne of likening himself to a 'political dissident' whose job it was to oppose government policy.

He also revealed that the prince 'bombarded' ministers with letters and secretly briefed the media on delicate matters of diplomacy when it suited his personal agenda.

In a momentous High Court hearing yesterday, Mr Justice Blackburne ruled that the Mail on Sunday had been wrong to publish extracts from a 3,000-word manuscript regarding the 1997 handover of Hong Kong in which the prince likened Chinese dignitaries to 'appalling old waxworks' and claimed Tony Blair relied too heavily on focus groups.

He said the newspaper had breached Charles's 'confidence and copyright' and gave him permission to sue for damages - even though the prince's lawyers agreed that the document in question could be published by newspapers during last month's hearing.

But the judge qualified this by saying that the Mail on Sunday had an 'eminently arguable' case that other journals in their possession were different and it would be wrong to block their publication without a full hearing.

'The application succeeds in respect of the claims in confidence and copyright concerning the Hong Kong journal.

The claims in respect of the other journals must go forward to trial,' he said, The prince's legal team had argued that the journals - which, it is believed, were handed to the newspaper by an ex-employee - were private and intended only for the ' amusement' of close family and friends.

His lawyers claimed that he was entitled to keep his musings private 'like any other citizen' and asked the judge to rule in their favour without going to a full trial as the newspaper had no legitimate defence.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charles Faces New Court Trial to Win Back His Journals; JUDGE REJECTS DEMAND FOR RETURN OF MANUSCRIPTS THAT REVEAL HIS VIEWS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.