Albanian News Breaks in New York

By Luxner, Larry | Editor & Publisher, August 21, 1993 | Go to article overview

Albanian News Breaks in New York


Luxner, Larry, Editor & Publisher


A Bronx, N.Y.-based ethnic newspaper is not quite two years old but has become an important source of information on Bosnia-Herzegovina and the Balkan conflict.

Illyria, published twice a week in English and Albanian, is the brain-child of Harry Bajraktari, a 35-year-old Albanian businessman who immigrated to the United States in 1970 from his native Kosova.

That region, populated mostly by ethnic Albanian Muslims, recently declared its independence from Serbia and is expected to be the next flash point in a war that has taken 100,000 lives and has devastated the former Yugoslavia.

"We're the only source of information that comes twice a week on Kosova," said Bajraktari in a recent interview in New York. "We get calls from all over the country. Our voice is heard by senators, the State Department and on Capitol Hill."

Adds Deborah Jo Angus, the paper's managing editor, "We pride ourselves on being the most comprehensive publication on the Balkans. We run on average between 10 and 15 articles an issue, more than anyone else. You might see one or two stories a day in the New York Times, but we try to delve a little deeper."

Illyria, which means "freedom" in Albanian, was born in June 1991, the same week James Baker attracted a crowd of 300,000 people in Tirana and became the first U.S. secretary of state to visit Albania in more than 50 years.

The 24-page newspaper has appeared every Wednesday and Saturday since then. Some 4,000 copies circulate in the United States and another 5,500 are mailed to Europe and elsewhere.

For the moment, Illyria faces little competition. The only other newspapers serving the 250,000-member Albanian-American community are Liria - a four-page monthly opinion paper published in Boston - and the newly established Albanian Herald in Detroit.

Bajraktari declined to say how much he invested to launch the paper, but he does expect Illyria to break even in six months.

Angus says at least 40% of every issue is devoted to the Balkan crisis.

A typical recent issue of Illyria contained articles on President Clinton's peace plan for Bosnia, the expulsion of 2,000 Albanians from Greece, growing Serb tension in Macedonia and Albania's efforts to attract foreign investment in oil-drilling ventures. There is also strong local coverage of community activities, with news on everything from the latest Albanian Orthodox Church controversy to New York's All-Albanian soccer team.

The paper also serves another function: It helps Albanians in their home-land and in the United States to learn English.

Advertisers - mainly restaurants, travel agencies and immigration lawyers - cater specifically to the Albanian community in New York.

In addition to subscribing to Inter Press Service, Reuters and the Associated Press, Illyria has two full-time staffers in Tirana; three in Prishtine, Kosova; one in the newly independent Macedonia, and one in Montenegrol which along with Serbia forms the greatly reduced Yugoslav Federation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Albanian News Breaks in New York
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.