Welcome to the Art Institute of Chicago

By Marable-Bunch, Maria | School Arts, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Welcome to the Art Institute of Chicago


Marable-Bunch, Maria, School Arts


At the Art Institute of Chicago, we hope you are enjoying this school year's editions of SchoolArts highlighting works of art at our museum, and that you are looking forward to visiting our museum to see many of them in our galleries, especially during the NAEA National Convention here in March.

Teacher Programs

The Art Institute is proud of its services to teachers and students. We offer workshops and courses that provide teachers of all levels and disciplines with a knowledge base in the visual arts while making instructive links to a wide array of other subjects, from science and literature, to studio processes.

While in the museum, visit our Elizabeth Stone Robson Teacher Resource Center, located in the Kraft Education Center. The center is a free research facility for teachers, art volunteers, parents, and other educators. More than 1,000 curriculum guides, teacher packets, slide sets, transparency sets, posters, postcards, books, videos, and CD-ROMs are available to purchase, view, copy, and/or borrow.

The Collections

After browsing the resource center, take a leisurely walk through our galleries and see many of the works of art featured in the magazine. The museum houses more than 270,000 art objects; some of them as old as 5,000 years and some of them created recently by living artists. The Art Institute contains many distinguished collections--Asian Art, Ancient Art, our world-renowned nineteenth-century French paintings (Impressionism and Post-Impressionism), and the American arts collection. The Art Institute acquired several works of art from the Terra Foundation of American Art, thus expanding the collection to be one of the most extensive in the United States.

Don't forget to see the museum's collection of modern and contemporary art representing most of the significant artistic movements in Europe and America from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. …

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