Clyde's Altered Image Is the Art of the Matter; Anniesland College Students Create Pieces of Public Art to Highlight Riverside Regeneration

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), April 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Clyde's Altered Image Is the Art of the Matter; Anniesland College Students Create Pieces of Public Art to Highlight Riverside Regeneration


TH E River Clyde is a famous symbol of Glasgow and today the waterfront is the centre of major change and regeneration.

It has also provided the focus for art students at Glasgow's Anniesland College who are creating an exhibition to highlight that change.

The Higher National Diploma Public Art students were asked to produce a piece of temporary or permanent artwork for the Clyde.

Their exhibition ranges from paintings, models, ceramics and sculptures to projected images, animation and photography.

The students were given a choice of different aspects of the Clyde to interpret, including people and trades and how they have evolved, public use of the Clyde or the wildlife returning to the river.

Public art is all about responding to the environment through art so the students' impressive work reflects the feedback they got from the public during the project.

Course tutor Lorraine Aaron said: "We encouraged the students to use the city as a resource for their work and this project fits in well with that idea.

"They went out into areas of the city and questioned people about their environment and how they might use the places around the riverside.

"They listened to stories and memories as well as some negative comments, but all of this helped to form their ideas. …

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