Divisive 'Problems Ahead' for U.N. Eliasson Counters U.S. Doubts on New Rights Panel

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Divisive 'Problems Ahead' for U.N. Eliasson Counters U.S. Doubts on New Rights Panel


Byline: David R. Sands and Betsy Pisik, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The president of the U.N. General Assembly yesterday defended the world body's overhaul of its human rights panel, but warned that in the days ahead, the United Nations faces an even more difficult fight over critical management reforms.

"We have problems ahead of us. I will not hide the fact that the management issues are very difficult and we face a polarization of the membership," veteran Swedish diplomat Jan Eliasson said in an interview with reporters and editors at The Washington Times.

That polarization reared its head late Tuesday, when a bloc of developing nations introduced a resolution that could postpone indefinitely the progress on reforms sought by wealthier states. U.N. officials called it a "classic blocking tactic," and U.S. Ambassador John R. Bolton told The Washington Times in New York yesterday that the ploy could sabotage reforms sought by the United States.

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has placed reform of the body's bureaucracy at the heart of his blueprint to revive the United Nations. Citing the staffing, oversight and management problems exposed in the Iraq oil-for-food scandal, critics in Congress have proposed tying U.S. contributions to the U.N. budget to significant reforms in New York.

But Mr. Eliasson also faces heavy counterpressure from the "Group of 77," a bloc of developing countries in the General Assembly that fears management changes will weaken its influence, eliminate jobs and threaten aid programs.

Mr. Eliasson, who wears an unusual double hat as Sweden's newly appointed foreign minister, was at the heart of the tense negotiations over the much-criticized human rights agency, a top Bush administration priority.

The United States, saying Mr. Eliasson's compromise did not go far enough to strengthen the agency, was one of just four countries to vote against adopting the Human Rights Council.

Mr. Eliasson said he respected the U.S. position and held out hope that Washington would expand its cooperation with the new body in the coming years.

"I have been involved with human rights for my entire career, and I can say I sleep well at night over what we accomplished," Mr. Eliasson said. "I think it is a very good basis to work for human rights, and the fact that the United States says it will work with the new council is a sign, I think, that we passed the quality test. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Divisive 'Problems Ahead' for U.N. Eliasson Counters U.S. Doubts on New Rights Panel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.