Moving Forward

By Lapan, Richard T. | Professional School Counseling, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Moving Forward


Lapan, Richard T., Professional School Counseling


This will be my last issue as editor of Professional School Counseling. For the past two and one-half years it has been an honor to serve as editor of this fine journal. It is now my time to transition out of this role and pass the leadership reins over to the next leadership team. I am pleased to tell you that Dr. Rick Auger has agreed to move from associate editor to editor. We are fortunate to have such a highly qualified counselor educator commit his time and talents to serve the profession in this manner. Having worked with Rick in his role as associate editor, I feel fortunate to be able to step down knowing that the journal is in such capable hands. In addition, Dr. Amy Milsom, a counselor educator at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a long-time editorial board member, has agreed to become our next associate editor. Amy brings a wide range of talents and expertise to this position. She is a gifted writer and will make an outstanding associate editor for our journal. As I have discovered over the past several years, being editor of this journal is both rewarding and extremely challenging. I am confident that the many people who have helped mc with the journal will now join both Rick and Amy in moving our work forward. Working together we can achieve important things for our profession.

Professional School Counseling has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few years. We regularly receive many high-quality submissions, which enables us to be increasingly selective and further enhance the journal's reputation. We have several special issues nearing completion, and reactions to the new "Extended Discussion" section of the journal have been positive. Our new online submission and review procedures are helping us streamline the review process, shorten turnaround times, and improve the quality of the articles we publish. Members and subscribers can now earn CEU credits by reading the journal, and we expect to soon be listed on the leading citations' index, along with other high-quality journals.

Obviously, these improvements in the journal and our solid current situation have only been possible because of the hard work and leadership provided by a number of people. I particularly want to single out the work of Kathleen Rakestraw and the dedicated ASCA staff who have helped me each step of the way. Without Kathleen's assistance, insight, and direction, I would not have been nearly as successful in my role as editor. Together, we have been able to implement a plan to handle the extensive amount of work required to publish the journal. Now, our turnaround time on submitted manuscripts and acceptance rates compares most favorably to leading journals in other fields. This would not have been possible without Kathleen's efforts and the timely services of other ASCA staff members.

No journal can be successful without an effective editorial board. We are fortunate to have many counselor educators and professional school counselors volunteer to review manuscripts. This is a difficult job to do. It takes a considerable amount of time to thoroughly review a manuscript. I want to thank each of you who have taken this role seriously and completed rigorous reviews for the journal. In particular, I have come to greatly appreciate the unique perspective that practicing counselors bring to the review process. Our new online submission and review process also opens up possibilities for greater interaction and feedback among editors, reviewers, and prospective authors. Again, thank you for putting me in a position where I could be successful.

Moving Forward

I believe professional school counseling has the potential to be one of the most important forces that empowers an increasingly diverse spectrum of youth to have the capacity to fully participate in the benefits and responsibilities of our evolving pluralistic democracy. Our field has great potential to be of enormous benefit to the increasingly diverse groups of people that rely on public school education to help their children create personally valued and desired futures. …

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