Blasphemy Laws May Be Extended to Muslims

Daily Mail (London), April 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

Blasphemy Laws May Be Extended to Muslims


Byline: JAMES SLACK;STEVE DOUGHTY

ANCIENT blasphemy laws could be extended to protect Muslims, it emerged yesterday.

Ministers said they were willing to consider the case for changing the laws, which at present only cover attacks on the tenets and beliefs of the Church of England.

The move raises the prospect of charges against anyone who criticises or pokes fun at Mohammed.

Cartoon images of the Prophet - printed across Europe, although not in Britain - caused protests across the Muslim world earlier this year.

The fact Ministers are mulling a change in the blasphemy laws is a surprise as they have just passed a Religious and Racial Hatred Act in the face of fierce opposition in Parliament.

This offers protection to multiethnic faiths such as Islam which are not covered in existing laws which apply to faith groups from one ethnic background such as Jews and Sikhs.

Blasphemy laws were at one stage to have been abolished in favour of new religious hatred legislation.

But, under pressure from Turkey, which wants EU-wide blasphemy regulations, Ministers may now look at extending the law.

Any new blasphemy law could be used to strengthen the new religious hatred laws, which were watered down in a rebellion by MPs and peers earlier this year.

The Commons inflicted a defeat on the Government and removed clauses banning 'abusive and insulting' material aimed at religious belief.

Unlike other EU nations which flatly refused the Turkish request, Home Office Minister Baroness Scotland said she would be 'content' to listen to their case.

She invited Muslims and other faith groups to come forward and lobby the Government.

In a statement to the House of Lords, she said: 'Any change relating to the law of blasphemy would have to begin with a review in which various options could be considered.

'All UK faiths and interested parties, particularly the established Church, would need to be consulted and the issues examined in some depth.

'We have no plans to initiate such work, but would be content to listen to representations on the subject. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blasphemy Laws May Be Extended to Muslims
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.