YourLIFE: Our Lives Began at 50; MANY PEOPLE SLOW DOWN WHEN THEY HIT HALF A CENTURY BUT NOT OUR FIVE HUMAN DYNAMOS. THEIR LIVES HAVE DEFINITELY TAKEN TURNS FOR THE BETTER

The Mirror (London, England), April 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

YourLIFE: Our Lives Began at 50; MANY PEOPLE SLOW DOWN WHEN THEY HIT HALF A CENTURY BUT NOT OUR FIVE HUMAN DYNAMOS. THEIR LIVES HAVE DEFINITELY TAKEN TURNS FOR THE BETTER


Byline: BY MADELEINE BAILEY

I got on my bike for cancer

LAST October Sue Young, 50, a call-centre operator from West Kingsdown, Kent, cycled nearly 400 miles and raised pounds 5,000 for cancer patients. Sue is married to Tony, 47, a communications engineer, and has two children, James, 15 and Nicole, 13.

WHEN Dad died in 1990 from cancer of the lymph glands, he'd asked for his ashes to be scattered on Table Mountain. He'd fallen in love with South Africa after visiting my brother, who lives in Cape Town.

I couldn't travel there to see the ashes scattered as I was pregnant, but when I saw an ad for the Macmillan Cancer Support 2005 challenge it seemed like my chance to go there and also help cancer sufferers.

I was approaching 50 and needed to achieve something just for me - as a mum it's easy to lose a sense of your own identity. So I registered and began training last spring. My life went on hold. When I wasn't working or cycling I'd be collecting money at village fairs or outside supermarkets.

The cycle ride was 600km in eight days. The tracks were so bumpy it felt like you were holding on to a pneumatic drill. The wind blew dust in your face in 80-degree heat. But I compared my discomfort to the real suffering of people with cancer and that spurred me on.

It's given me lots of confidence. When Nicole had to write an essay about someone she admired, she chose me. I was so touched. I'm planning another challenge in 2007. Age isn't a barrier, it's just in the mind."

Macmillan Cancer Support: www.macmillan.org.uk 020 7840 7875.

Fear drove me to be a novelist

WHEN financial disaster hit her family, Betty Maura-Cooper, 73, of Hay-on-Wye, Powys, discovered a talent for writing. Betty has four grown-up children.

AT 49 my husband's business collapsed and we lost everything. A week later he had a massive heart attack due to the stress. He survived but was unable to work again so I got a job as a secretary.

Then I read a magazine article about women who were making thousands from writing Mills & Boon novels and I thought: "I could do that." So, driven by fear and determination, I began to write a novel in the evenings and at weekends.

My first two attempts were rejected. Then I heard that Robert Hale published short romantic books so I edited the first novel and they accepted it.

Called Just Dreams, it was published in 1990 under my pseudonym Marigold West. Seeing it in print was incredibly exciting.

Two years later my second novel, Truth To Tell, was published, followed by my third, Echoes Of Another Love. Since then I've written lots of short stories for women's magazines.

After Donald died in 1992, my son Jason and I set up a holiday home for walkers, which we ran for four years. Now I'm back in full swing and working on a crime mystery.

Writing hasn't just paid the bills, it's given a new dimension to my life. But despite joining cupidbay.com, an online dating site - I haven't considered re-marrying.

Donald was a hard act to follow.

My job's to diet for

CHRISTINE Squire, 55, from Bexleyheath, Kent, went from being a couch potato to a Rosemary Conley Diet and Fitness Club leader. She's married to businessman Peter, 60 and has two grown-up sons.

HEALTH problems throughout my 40s and a job in my husband's bakery did nothing for my waistline - at 5ft 8ins I weighed 14st and was a size 20.

I joined the Rosemary Conley Diet and Fitness Club and lost 4 stones in 18 months, but I still needed a challenge. I was approaching 50 and thinking: "What have I done with my life?" So when I saw an ad to be a Rosemary Conley group leader I applied and was accepted for training. Afterwards, I was chuffed to find out only two per cent of applicants get that far.

I cashed in an endowment policy to buy the franchise. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

YourLIFE: Our Lives Began at 50; MANY PEOPLE SLOW DOWN WHEN THEY HIT HALF A CENTURY BUT NOT OUR FIVE HUMAN DYNAMOS. THEIR LIVES HAVE DEFINITELY TAKEN TURNS FOR THE BETTER
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.