Art Events, Exhibits for Everyone

By Jancsurak, Joe | Art Business News, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Art Events, Exhibits for Everyone


Jancsurak, Joe, Art Business News


From live interviews with big-name contemporary artists to a live performance painting; from the unveiling of a never-before-seen Dr. Seuss Sculpture and a never-before seen painting by Winston Churchill to detailed digital reproductions of ancient Japanese works; from Olympic artists to former Olympic athletes, Artexpo New York, held March 2-6, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, offered plenty in the way of exciting events as well as special exhibits.

Rob Spademan, director of marketing and sales of Pfingsten Publishing, which owns the show, announced that this year's Artexpo New York was the most successful year in the show's 28-year history, attracting more than 39,000 attendees.

Featuring original paintings, photography, sculpture, animation, limited-edition prints and giclees, and decorative art from traditional and cutting-edge artists, Artexpo New York encompasses the entire spectrum of the art world, offering art for both first-time and experienced buyers, priced from $500 to $50,000. Works by more than 2,500 artists were shown by 500 exhibitors on the 294,000 square-foot show.

In addition to the special events and exhibits, there were the parties, such as the one held by Collectors Editions to celebrate its 20th anniversary at the Marquee nightclub and the one held at the Lotus in honor of the exhibitors who populated Pavilion. This new art fair concept delivered a unique collection of original works shown by nearly 30 world-class retail galleries, including nine international galleries representing Argentina, Australia, Canada, Dominican Republic, Italy, Mexico, Mongolia, Spain and South Korea.

Also introduced to the show's Platinum exhibitors this year was a new look: 12-foot high white walls with truss lighting to showcase their artists and works in a museum-like quality setting.

"Artexpo New York is the biggest fine art event of the year," says Eric Smith, vice president, Pfingsten Publishing. "There is no other exposition that offers the range and depth of art that Artexpo New York provides."

For an overview of the events and exhibitors, as well as Artexpo artist profiles, please check out the photos and captions on the following pages.

* Chuck Wimmer, Cleveland, is shown with his hand-drawn (using an electronic pen) giclee prints. The works are originals and are not scanned reproductions, says Wimmer.

* A Opening DECOR Expo, held concurrently with Artexpo, were dancers from the Umoja Dance Company, Montclair, NJ.

* Nearly 500 exhibitors and 2,600 artists drew more than 39,000 Artexpo visitors.

* Former Olympic athletes joined actress/painter Jane Seymour and other official Olympic artists to unveil the Official Olympic artwork by Fine Art Limited for the 2006 Olympic Winter Games at the 2006 New York Artexpo. Shown left to right are Irish Olympian Hazel Green (Archery, 1984, 1988); Otis Davis (two-time Gold Medalist as a member of the U.S. Track & Field team); Bruce MacDonald (U.S. Race Walking team member: 1956, 1960 and 1964 and team manager: 1972 and 1976); Jane Seymour; and Greek Olympian Michael Voudoris (Skeleton, 2002).

* A Heidi Leigh, director of Animazing Gallery and Bill Dreyer, who manages The Chase Group's (Northbrook, IL) Dr. Seuss Art line, are all smiles following the unveiling of a never-before-seen Dr. Seuss sculpture. The sculpture is titled, "Cat in the Hat." The work is a bronze sculpture, 15 x 7 1/2 x 12 inches, from the inaugural Tribute series by Leo Rijin, lead sculptor and art director on the Seuss Landing Project at Universal Studios, Orlando.

* A While Artexpo was being held, a unique service project was underway throughout New York, with salami on rye sandwiches being distributed to 1,500 underprivileged people. The food items included 1,800 pounds of salami and were donated courtesy of Mill Basin Kosher Deli, Hebrew National and Certified Bakery. Meanwhile, marking the occasion at Artexpo was a unique collaboration involving 3D artist James Rizzi, titled "Brooklyn--It Ain't Just a Freakin' Tree. …

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