Time for Less Politics, Violence

Manila Bulletin, May 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Time for Less Politics, Violence


Byline: Fred M. Lobo

MAJORITY of our people want our country to move forward now instead of remaining embroiled in political controversies and squabbling.

Time for less politics!

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According to a survey of the Social Weather Station, 58 percent of Filipinos agree that the opposition "should start helping our country and stop too much politics."

Time for cooperation, not special operations.

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Also, 51 percent say it's time to forego bitterness over the 2004 elections and let President GMA "focus on the real problems of the nation."

Time to work. No more wild ampalaya syndrome.

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The rest either say they disagree, remain undecided, or just refuse to answer. Perhaps, they are unconcerned or have just gotten numb and tired.

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Meanwhile, the opposition insists on its call for PGMA to call for snap polls purportedly to avert a civil war.

PGMA will likely snap back and call it "uncivil."

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Leaders of the House Majority say that such call and warning on a civil war are ill-advised and ill-timed.

Everything ill? What ails us sirs?

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House Majority leader Prospero Nograles says such warning may scare prospective investors and even local businessmen.

No prosperity, no new jobs - and no facilitation fees or commission. Whew!

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House Deputy Leader Antonio Cerilles adds that politicians should only propose actions that are within the Constitution.

Not things that are unpalatable - or could cause constipation.

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Meanwhile, NCR Police Director Vidal Querol calls for a "new beginning" this Labor Day on protest actions which he said should abide by the rule of law. …

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