Nat'l Security vs Press Freedom

Manila Bulletin, May 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Nat'l Security vs Press Freedom


Byline: Dr. Florangel R Braid

AS we celebrate World Press Freedom Day, we are faced with a grim reminder from the International Press Institute that press freedom in the country is fast deteriorating. When Manila was the venue for the celebration of the 9th WPF Day in 2002, and also the site for the conference on Media and Terrorism, much had happened since then. We have just passed a controversial law on terrorism which is being questioned by several sectors, including members of our Muslim population. The 2006 Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize awardee, Lebanese TV newscaster, May Chidac was a victim of terrorist attack where she lost a hand and her left leg. The 13th WPF Day celebration this year is being held in Sri Lanka, a country that has gone through several decades of war against extremists. In the Philippines, there had been negative developments in these areas (1) an increase in the number of journalists killed with impunity; and (2) use of the emergency powers of the President (1017) to justify infringement on press freedom.

It is a coincidence that the constitutionality of 1017 is now being debated upon by the Supreme Court which expects to come out very soon with a decision. Judging from their recent record, we, the public anticipate a decision that would continue to safeguard our human rights and democracy.

At the 2002 Manila Conference, some 150 media professionals and representatives of non-government organizations from different parts of the world resolved "that any strategy to address the threat of terrorism must, first and foremost, promote greater respect for freedom of expression and of the media, rather than impose restrictions on these fundamental rights." Furthermore, they stressed that the media have the right to report on terrorism in the interest of the public's right to know and to promote open and informed debate on the issue. They called on governments, institutions, public bodies and media organizations to do all in their power to ensure the safety of journalists at all times and under all circumstances.

It was at the Manila Conference which he keynoted that UNESCO Director-General Koichiro Matsuura made his first official visit to the country. At the conference, he noted: "One of the most worrying results of terrorism is that it may cause some countries to impose forms of control and regulation which constrain democracy, freedom of expression, and free, independent, and pluralistic media. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nat'l Security vs Press Freedom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.