Golf: Must-Haves to Keep One Shot Ahead of the Rest; BOOK REVIEWS

The Birmingham Post (England), May 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

Golf: Must-Haves to Keep One Shot Ahead of the Rest; BOOK REVIEWS


Byline: Peter Sharkey

Dave Pelz's Short Game Bible (Aurum Press) [4sportsbooks.co.uk price: pounds 12.53]

Golf is not a game of Perfect (Pocket Books) [4sportsbooks.co.uk price: pounds 3.99]

The Swing Factory (Simon & Schuster) [4sprtsbooks.co.uk price: pounds 16.50]

Blue skies do wonders for golfers. Even after you have played a poor shot, looking at the broad sward of recently-mown fairway or a beautifully-kept green while the sun is shining can lift the spirits. That is, before you disappear in search of a brand new ball which has just careered into the ground ivy.

Stop and smell the flowers? Get another ball out of the bag, more like.

Such a scenario explains why golf instruction texts have always sold well. New players absorb their every word prior to developing their own bad habits, while more established types scour them in search of what it was they learnt in the first place in order to correct whatever it was that went wrong.

In recent times, such has been the level of the game's popularity that even more books focusing upon golf's techniques and strategies have appeared, so as those blue skies show every sign of sticking around, we've chosen three of the best, each of which is designed to improve your game.

Dave Pelz's Short Game Bible opens with a clutch of facts which probably surprise few amateur golfers. According to Pelz, between 60 and 65 per cent of golf shots occur within 100 yards of the hole, yet some 80 per cent of strokes golfers lose to par take place in the same comparatively condensed area.

Every golfer knows that, "but if," says Pelz, "you are in reasonably good health, can walk the meadows, hear the birds . . . and make contact with the little white ball, you can learn to score better." It's a difficult proposition for any golfer to refuse, which makes Pelz's tome a 'must-have' for handicappers of all levels.

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