Debit Cards Gain at Supermarkets, Gas Stations

By Kutler, Jeffrey | American Banker, October 19, 1993 | Go to article overview

Debit Cards Gain at Supermarkets, Gas Stations


Kutler, Jeffrey, American Banker


A study by Payment Systems Inc. has confirmmed that debit cards are making their greatest inroads in the petroleum and supermarket industries, but each for different reasons.

"Food stores are driven more by competitive reasons - they are not necessarily doing it just for the customer," said Martha Rea, senior vice president of the Tampa, Fla.-based firm.

"The oil and gas companies do it mainly to attract the customer," said Ms. Rea, who supervised the research into merchant attitudes that was commissioned by Verifone Inc., the point of sale equipment manufacturer.

Room to Grow

Debit cards have plenty of room to grow across all types of merchants. As reported in a Sept. 28 American Banker article on the credit card findings of the PSI-Verifone study, debit cards accounted for 2% of the transactions and 3% of the sales volume at the 540 retailers surveyed.

Cash and checks combined for 80% of transactions and 73% of sales.

Financial institutions in the United States have issued more than 200 million debit cards, most of them initially for automated teller machines. Virtually all banks with significant shares of their retail markets have issued debit cards.

In the 1993 American Banker consumer survey, conducted last spring by the Gallup Organization, 13% of the respondents said they had conducted retail debit transactions, and 19% more expressed an interest in the service.

Debit cards' potential was greatest in the West, where point of sale networks and merchants' involvement are most advanced. In that region, 31% said they had the cards, 19% had used them, and 18% more expressed interest.

Need for Education Seen

Ms. Rea said further growth in point of sale debit transactions will require both customer and retailer education.

The American Banker/Gallup data indicated many consumers don't know they have debit cards. While 60% said they carried ATM cards, which in many cases would have been usable at the point of sale, only 18% said they had any type of debit card.

"Marketing directly to consumers could have a significant impact on the rate of debit expansion," Payment Systems Inc. concluded in its report on the Verifone study.

As for the retailers, "A lot of the smaller merchants still need to be told what debit is," Ms. Rea told a seminar in Washington last month sponsored by Verifone.

In telephone interviews early this year with the 540 retailers, PSI found that 18% of petroleum marketers and 12% of grocery companies were accepting debit cards.

Customer service was not a motivator: only 11 of 90 oil and gas respondents and one of 90 food stores said service was a factor in their decision to accept debit cards.

By contrast, 46% of the food stores said they were responding to competitive pressure by accepting debit cards, 28% said the policy would attract new customers, and 27% saw individual customer spending - the "average ticket" - rising as a result.

Among oil and gas retailers, 31% said competitive pressure moved them to accept debit cards, 38% did it to attract new customers, and 25% expected higher average tickets.

Overall Average 7%

In no other merchant category did more than 7% accept debit card payments, which was the average for all retailers in the survey. …

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Debit Cards Gain at Supermarkets, Gas Stations
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