We Are All God's People

Anglican Journal, October 2005 | Go to article overview

We Are All God's People


The Anglican Appeal is THE way to support your church's mission and ministry

Every year the Anglican Appeal helps to fund our church's vital mission and ministry work in Canada, especially in the North, and with our overseas partners:

* Theological Training and Education--From tiny northern towns to large urban parishes, you help to support dedicated theological students working to become strong spiritual and community leaders.

* Partners in Mission projects with overseas dioceses--Because of your support, Anglican clergy in Sri Lanka's devastated tsunami zone received specialized trauma training to help them--and their parishes--to cope with the tragedy. Working in partnership, our Canadian church reaches out to our global Anglican family.

* Volunteers in Mission program--You help to fund the administration of a program that is all about giving and receiving. People from all walks of Canadian life--like Anna and Michael whom you'll read about below--volunteer their time and talents in ways that change lives--including their own.

Your support makes a huge difference here at home and around the world. Fuelled by their faith and energy to drive positive change, your Anglican family is counting on your prayers and financial help. Be a part of the transforming power of God's love by giving to the Anglican Appeal.

A Message from the Primate

The other day I had one of those nostalgic moments when I heard Louis Armstrong's version of What a Wonderful World. Armstrong introduced the song with a monologue saying, "People don't believe it's really a wonderful world in which we're living after all." Many would surely look at the state of our world and wonder whether it's wonderful or not.

Every day, our television screens are filled with pictures from Iraq, New Orleans, Niger and many other places that seem far, far away from Louis Armstrong's Wonderful World.

The Anglican Appeal cannot by itself make the world a wonderful place. But it can, and does make a difference. The theme of this year's campaign is We are all God's people. To understand that is to see ourselves as part of a world where we can make a difference. The prayers that you offer and the financial gifts you make, give hope and faith to desperate people in many places and many circumstances. Since WE are all God's people you give to a brother or a sister not a handout, but the gift of life. As the song says, you are "really saying 'I love you.'"

Thank you for your support of this Appeal as we all work, through our contributions, to making a wonderful world.

Yours faithfully Andrew

"My training is my treasure

How did a Chilean-born, multi-lingual, multi-tasking priest come to be ministering to several downtown Toronto churches? Through a grant made possible in part by your Anglican Appeal donation, the Rev. Maurice Francois came to study at Trinity College in Toronto several years ago. In 2002, he proposed a new ministry aimed at Latin American-Canadians, a community made up of mostly new immigrants in downtown Toronto. Now Mr. Francois--who also ministers part-time to three other Toronto parishes--is a welcoming face at St. Stephen-in-the-Field (San Esteban) church.

Here, Mr. Francois admits, ministry can be a complex task, and he feels he is learning right alongside his parishioners. "Many of the people are from Colombia, El Salvador and Mexico with some from Chile or Argentina," he says. "Many have left their countries because of a crisis, often involving political issues or corruption. They can't believe they can walk the streets without having to show identification." At the same time, these new immigrants are mourning the loss of their homeland, he explains, their grief sometimes propelling them into seeking out a new relationship with God and their church. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

We Are All God's People
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.