Child Labor Curbed with Awareness, Reform

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

Child Labor Curbed with Awareness, Reform


Byline: John Zarocostas, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Washington Times special correspondent John Zarocostas in Geneva recently interviewed Guy Thijs, director of the International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC). The technical cooperation program, established in 1992 by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and active in 86 countries, has brought the child labor problem to the attention of the world.

Question: After years of effort, IPEC seems to be delivering results to help child laborers worldwide. To what do you attribute this?

Answer: Well, I wouldn't say that it's IPEC that has produced those results; it's the work of the countries where we operate. But we do feel that we have played a role in really raising awareness about child labor. The fact is that the ILO convention on child labor is now being ratified by the majority of the (ILO member) states. In fact, Convention 182 has been ratified in nine out of 10 member states 160 of the 178 members.

But what has really made a difference is that awareness-raising that we have generated is resulting in programs that really get children out of work and into school. And the governments are putting resources into those themselves. So we have been there as a catalyst and facilitator, and now see that governments take on this program and really put in resources themselves.

Q: What are some of the things IPEC does on the ground?

A: We have a range of interventions, and you could call [it] a menu because we really tailor-make the program to the problems of the country. One is, obviously, data collection. We have developed a methodology for credible data collection on child labor.

So we can help countries with that, because the knowledge base is the first step that you need to work on if you want to deal with the problem. The second is assistance in reforming legislation. Countries need to look at their legislation to bring it in line with the conventions.

The third thing is enforcement. If you have legislation, you have to work on your enforcement. We do train labor inspectors; we have a capacity-building program for labor inspectors. We also work on developing alternative monitoring systems, because labor inspectors cannot always go to the informal sector. So we help countries set up community-based monitoring systems, involving local communities as watchdogs in the process.

We have programs, then, that look at policies. How can you make your education policy more relevant I would say more attractive to child workers? Education in many cases is not acceptable to child laborers because it does not take into account their specific needs. So we work with countries in that field as well.

And last, what is very important is that we also help countries in concrete action programs that can serve as models. We don't just preach and say, "This is the way you should do it." We also provide assistance in implementing programs by actually working with the government, and other partners, by getting children out of work and into school; helping parents to improve their income levels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Child Labor Curbed with Awareness, Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.