Assessment of Teachers' Perception of Instructional Media Use in Colleges of Education in Southern Nigeria

By Ogiegbaen, S. E. Aduwa | International Journal of Instructional Media, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Assessment of Teachers' Perception of Instructional Media Use in Colleges of Education in Southern Nigeria


Ogiegbaen, S. E. Aduwa, International Journal of Instructional Media


BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

The beginning of the use of media for instructional purposes in Nigerian schools dates back to the era of the teacher training colleges during the Colonial Period. During this period, teacher trainees were encouraged to produce low-cost instructional materials and improvise teaching support materials. Teacher-trainees were expected to exhibit these materials and use them as part of their practical teaching exercise (Agun & Imogie, 1988). This practice continued for sometime till the 1950s when the federal government began to show interest in the use of audiovisual materials by establishing audiovisual sections in the ministries of education in the then three regions - the Western, Eastern and Northern regions.

These audiovisual sections were made to liase with broadcasting stations and by 1957 the use of radio in education started. Thereafter audiovisual materials became widely used in schools. By the mid- 1960s to the early 1970s, audiovisual sections were established in Colleges of Education and Universities with the help of international agencies such as Ford Foundation, the British Broadcasting Corporation, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Carnegie Corporation and the British Council. The international agencies helped in the training of specialists in the field of educational technology and provided material support also. By the end of the 1970s, many higher institutions have established audiovisual centres or educational technology centres where media resources were harnessed for the purpose of improving teaching and learning.

Though many institutions established educational resources centers, there was however no standard practice, which led the federal government to prescribe a number of facilities and resources, which should be made available for instructional purposes at the various educational levels (National Policy on Education, 1981). However, due to the inadequacy of the provision made for educational media practices in the National Policy on Education, the Federal Government was to take another look at the issue of the use of media in educational institutions. The efficient and effective utilization of instructional media to improve the instructional system in higher education became an area of great concern to government and educational institutions. This concern was a demonstration of the invaluable role of technological gadgets in education. This is one of the reasons the Federal Ministry of Education commissioned the Joint Consultative Committee on Educational Technology to work out modalities for restructuring the educational technology program and the use of media in the country's educational institutions (Report on Uniform Nomenclature and Career Structure for Positions in Educational Technology, 1991).

The committee's recommendation that the various higher institutions, among others, should have a well equipped centre for educational technology that would give campus wide audio services to students, academic and non-academic staff, was accepted by the government and was to be implemented at the various educational levels according to what is prescribed for each.

THE PROBLEM

The blueprint which the Federal Government rolled out for guiding educational technology practice which was based on the report of the Joint Consultative Committee on Educational Technology in 1991 is a relatively new innovation in educational institutions in Nigeria. However, the adoption of any new innovation depends on a number of factors. One of these factors is the perception of the end users of the innovation. Perception about a particular object is a reflection of the attitude toward that object. Therefore, in order that the new guidelines for educational technology practice are adopted by teachers, who are the users, their perception about the use of instructional media must be seen to be positive.

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Assessment of Teachers' Perception of Instructional Media Use in Colleges of Education in Southern Nigeria
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