2006 AAHPERD Recognition Awards

JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, May-June 2006 | Go to article overview

2006 AAHPERD Recognition Awards


LUTHER HALSEY GULICK AWARD

The Luther Halsey Gulick Medal, designed by R. Tait McKenzie, is regarded as the highest honor of the Alliance in recognition of long and distinguished service to one or more of the professions.

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Lucinda W. Adams has had a distinguished career in health, physical education, and sports spanning six decades. As one of the first female athletes to excel in intercollegiate sports, Lucinda inspired a generation of girls and women in sport. As a physical education professional, she has opened doors for thousands of women, minority, and disabled students and athletes. As an AAHPERD leader, she has been a catalyst for innovation that has moved the organization forward.

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Lucinda is one of those rare professionals who have been able to translate personal accomplishment for the benefit of the community. As a celebrated track athlete, Lucinda used her participation in the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games and 1960 Rome Olympics to inspire youths across the country and to empower them to pursue their dreams. As an Olympic gold medalist, Lucinda has been an active advocate in promoting sports and education for disadvantaged youths.

Lucinda has served the profession with dignity, as AAHPERD president, NASPE president, Midwest District AAHPERD president, and Ohio AHPERD president. She has also served on the Ohio Governors Advisory Board on Physical Fitness and Sports and on the boards of directors for the Cincinnati Olympic Bid Committee, Massachusetts Senior Games, U.S. National Senior Sports Organization, Dayton Ronald McDonald House, and Ohio Special Olympics.

Lucinda has been recognized numerous times by her professional peers. Among her many awards are the AAHPERD Honor Award, Charles D. Henry Award, NAGWS Honor Award, Midwest AAHPERD Honor Award, NAGWS Nell C. Jackson Award, and the Ohio AHPERD Meritorious Award. She is also a recent inductee into the NASPE Hall of Fame and has received honorary degrees from Springfield College and the University of Dayton.

Lucinda Adams--a noteworthy leader, clearly outstanding in her profession, an example of the best in service, research, teaching and administration--is a person whose life and contributions symbolize the principles of the Luther Halsey Gulick Medal.

HONOR AWARDS

The Honor Awards are bestowed annually for meritorious service by members of the Alliance and to the professions represented. Recipients are designated as Honor Fellows in recognition of their high attainment.

Brenna O. Baringer is a consummate professional and mentor teacher who works in the San Diego city schools. For 14 years, she served as chairperson and teacher in Marston Middle School, and she recently accepted a position in the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment Induction Program.

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In 22 years of teaching, she has taught physical education, Spanish, science, and English as a second language. In 2001, she was among the first eight teachers in California to receive National Board certification in physical education.

Brenna served AAHPERD as vice president for programs of NAGWS for four years. Her innovative approaches and ideas contributed significantly to the programs, products, and services of AAHPERD. She served her state CAHPERD as vice president for GWS and her local unit as president.

Brenna has earned teaching and service awards, including the Educator of the Year Award for the California League of Middle Schools and the CAHPERD Girls and Women in Sport Service Award. Brenna has also presented extensively at local, state, and national conferences.

Ambrose E. Brazelton, "Braz," spent several years serving our country in the U.S. Army. After his service, Braz went on to teach elementary physical education for 13 years in Akron, Ohio, during which time he helped other professionals to better understand that problem children and children with disabilities deserve high-quality learning experiences. …

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