How Banks Are Teaching Workers to Make Use of New Technology

By Zack, Jeffrey | American Banker, December 10, 1993 | Go to article overview

How Banks Are Teaching Workers to Make Use of New Technology


Zack, Jeffrey, American Banker


Technology promises to cut costs, increase productivity, and improve service. But more technology also means having a more sophisticated work force. So, the American Banker asked a number of bankers: What training and educational opportunities is your bank offering employees?

We found that banks use a variety of methods, including formal in-house classes, training by outside educators and vendors, and subsidizing tuition at local colleges.

Bankers also cited the benefits of computer-based training, which allows employees to learn through on-line courses or with the assistance of an instructor.

Mixed Media

A few banks noted that they are moving toward multimedia course material.

Some training is broad in scope. Albert C. "Skip" Patterson, department executive of systems services at Bank of Boston, told how the bank implemented a new customer information system.

"We planned the transition over a weekend, which meant more than 3,000 people would use one system on Friday and another the following Monday," he said. …

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