Devoted Officers Died in the Line of Duty; A Ceremony Honors Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Graduates Who Died

By Stepzinski, Teresa | The Florida Times Union, May 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Devoted Officers Died in the Line of Duty; A Ceremony Honors Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Graduates Who Died


Stepzinski, Teresa, The Florida Times Union


Byline: TERESA STEPZINSKI

BRUNSWICK -- Loving son. Dedicated colleague. Faithful guardian of freedom.

Those words were spoken with tears Thursday as Special Agent Greg R. Boss of the U.S. Postal Service Office of the Inspector General was remembered and mourned along with other federal, state and local law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty.

The officers and their families were honored for their sacrifice during the Peace Officers Memorial Day Ceremony at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.

Boss, 35, who had graduated with honors from the center, was the victim of a "road rage" incident Nov. 8 on highway E-470 in Denver.

A rush-hour traffic dispute between two other drivers triggered a high-speed collision that propelled a sport utility vehicle across the highway median, where it crashed head-on into Boss' government vehicle, according to the Colorado State Patrol.

Boss had served with the inspector general's office for five years when he died. He was among seven Training Center graduates who died in the line of duty last year.

Their names have been engraved on the graduates memorial nestled amid towering pine trees at the heart of the 1,500-acre training facility.

Judy and Lee Boss traveled from their home in Centennial, Colo., to attend the solemn ceremony and share memories of their son with those who knew him from his training days.

"We dearly love him and miss him so much," Lee Boss said with a voice hoarse with emotion and unshed tears as he squeezed his wife's trembling hand.

The couple had been unable to attend their son's graduation, where he was named valedictorian of his training class. The memorial ceremony brought solace and comfort, they said.

"It means an awful lot to be here, to see where he was and what he did and to talk with the people who knew him," Lee Boss said.

Greg Boss was recalled as a man who cherished his family and friends, and who enjoyed hunting and muscle cars, according to his friends.

His parents were accompanied to the memorial by Assistant Special Agent in Charge Wayne M. Leaders, who was their son's supervisor and friend.

Leaders also had tears in his eyes as he described Greg Boss as a dedicated agent and conscientious co-worker.

"He was just a good guy. He was a good leader. Someone you could always count on, and a credit to the service," Leaders said.

The memorial now bears the names of 148 Training Center graduates killed in the line of duty since the center was established in 1970.

Each of their names, as well as those of 39 fallen state and local law enforcement officers, were read aloud in a final roll call during the ceremony attended by about 200 people. …

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