A Push for Partnerships; Encourage Entrepreneurship

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 31, 2006 | Go to article overview

A Push for Partnerships; Encourage Entrepreneurship


Byline: Sally Sternbach, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

If any region or, for that matter, if the United States, wants to remain a global technology leader, then two conditions are necessary: We must have a competitive workforce, and we must do a much better job of encouraging entrepreneurs to commercialize the technological discoveries made in our federal and university laboratories.

America has refined the art of national hand-wringing over the low support for science and math studies in our K-12 curriculum. Various programs have been supported in fits and starts over the years, but, in truth, our results on a global scale are still second rate.

The same might be said of technology transfer. We have gingerly worked at extracting technology discoveries from our federal and university research laboratories through out-licensing, and we have created offices of technology transfer. But the concept has never received a full embrace, and with very few exceptions the offices remain small and woefully underfunded. These issues beg for substantive long-term solutions; they also raise the question of whether there might be some shortcuts available. We believe we have found one.

The Washington region draws 1,500 to 2,000 post-doctoral fellows annually to do research in some 30 federal laboratories, including the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. An equal number become fellows at local universities. Fellowships are extremely competitive, with up to 10 applicants for a single fellowship. These are our best and brightest, new generation research scientists.

Fellows spend one to four years working on some of the world's thorniest problems in such cutting edge fields as neuropsychology, astrophysics, biomedical engineering and radio wave telecommunication. When their fellowships end, most of them drift away with the ultimate goal of finding an academic position. After all, it is a world they know well and one in which they have enjoyed significant success and recognition.

Unfortunately, there is an academic job shortage nationwide. A 2005 Sigma Xi publication, "Doctors Without Orders," concluded that "growth in the number of science and engineering postdocs over the past decade (2.8 percent per year) has outstripped the rate of increase in the number of full-time science and engineering faculty positions (0.8 percent per year) ..Most of the postdocs we surveyed will probably not become faculty members at a research university. Indeed, they will likely end up outside of academia altogether."

Herein lays an opportunity for a serendipitous matching of the supply and demand sides of the equation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Push for Partnerships; Encourage Entrepreneurship
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.