Letters


WE'LL DRINK TO THAT

Tsk, tsk -- the sign of a good journalist rests in good research. In the April Editor & Publisher, you said the Quill and the Pen club in Philadelphia (circa 1800s) was the oldest press club in America ("Social club for journos endures in Philly," p. 12). The Society of Professional Journalists gave an award to Milwaukee and their 1885 club because they were the oldest press club.

But the Denver Press Club is documented to be the oldest continuously operating press club, according to a 1877 article in a Denver paper. We bounced around from hotel to hotel in our early days, but the Denver Press Club continued to operate under the same name. We opened our own building in 1925 exclusively for use as the Denver Press Club, and continue to operate in the same building today.

We are the oldest documented press club in the country! What award do we win?

ALAN J. KANIA

The Denver Press Club

... AND TO THIS

A recent letter takes issue with various claims as to which press club in the U.S. is the oldest. The Milwaukee Press Club does not claim to be the oldest, nor does the recent SPJ honor state that.

The Milwaukee club claims to be the oldest "continuously operating" press club in the Americas -- and that is what the SPJ "Historic Sites in Journalism" honor recognizes. And yes, we did our research, including research of the Denver club, which clearly states in its "club history" account on its Web site that, while it was founded in 1884, it was resuscitated in 1905 after going out of operation.

The Milwaukee club has not ceased operating since 1885.

DAVID G. NILES

PAST PRESIDENT

The Milwaukee Press Club

ANOTHER 'ONE' THAT GOT AWAY

I was most amused to read the review of Howell Raines' The One That Got Away ("Pressing Issues," May E&P, p. 22). This is too coincidental to be fiction. You can't make this stuff up.

In addition to Jayson Blair (and a good many other authors, media companies, entertainment properties, TV personalities, and literary properties), I also represent the author of The One That Got Away. His name is Lee Robert Schreiber, and his book came out last fall. It is the memoir of his attempt to hook up with his ex-girlfriend, a woman who left him 25 years ago. …

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