Giving Something Back: Social Enterprise Is about More Than Recycling and Restaurants-As the Winners of an NS Awards Scheme Show. Kathryn Corrick Reports

By Corrick, Kathryn | New Statesman (1996), May 22, 2006 | Go to article overview

Giving Something Back: Social Enterprise Is about More Than Recycling and Restaurants-As the Winners of an NS Awards Scheme Show. Kathryn Corrick Reports


Corrick, Kathryn, New Statesman (1996)


Jamie Oliver's Fifteen restaurant may be the most famous example, but social enterprise is flourishing in Britain as never before--and once again the New Statesman's Upstarts Awards have turned the spotlight on the new breed of social entrepreneurs.

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The awards recognise the core of social enterprise: its people. As well as being visionaries and business leaders, social entrepreneurs are employers. They are educators and mentors who pass on practical skills and social values to their employees. With this in mind, our 2006 awards focused particularly on employers who invest in training and employees who have benefited from learning on the job.

The winner of Social Enterprise Team of the Year, Hoxton Apprentice Restaurant, is an inspirational example of team effort, co-operation and community impact. Hoxton's apprentices are mainly homeless and long-term unemployed. The team provides a stepping stone in the transition back into the "real" world of work, with 80 per cent of the apprentices moving on to permanent positions.

Carol Hughes, who won the Trainee of the Year award, has overcome challenges that would deter many others. Juggling work and training with being a single mum-of-four, Carol has become the star trainee driver at a recycling company. Before this, Carol says, she had no confidence and no idea how to get back into work. A colleague gave an idea of how far Carol has come: "At first the men treated her with kid gloves ... now she keeps them in line."

Social enterprise is not just about recycling and restaurants. Our other winners (see the panel below) are involved in some of the toughest and most competitive industries in the UK: clothing manufacture, construction and tourism. But it was the youngest entrants who won everyone's hearts. The judges decided to give a special commendation to a young set of entrepreneurs at Stonelaw High School. Working as a co-operative, they sell fair-trade goods everywhere from the school playground to local parish churches and markets. Since the co-operative started trading in 2003, sales have exceeded [pounds sterling]25,000. All profits have been donated to a British doctor, Ruth Bland, who works in South Africa with babies and children who are HIV-positive or have full-blown Aids. Dr Bland wrote to say: "If it hadn't been for you helping so much last year, we might not have had the courage to continue."

The Upstarts Awards were presented by Ed Miliband, the newly appointed minister for the third sector, at a ceremony in London on 10 May. …

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