My Daddy Told Me; FRANK SINATRA JR Was Six When His Famous Father Divorced His Mother to Wed Ava Gardner. He Tells PAULA KERR How, after Years Apart, He Became His Dad's Music Manager

Daily Mail (London), June 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

My Daddy Told Me; FRANK SINATRA JR Was Six When His Famous Father Divorced His Mother to Wed Ava Gardner. He Tells PAULA KERR How, after Years Apart, He Became His Dad's Music Manager


Byline: PAULA KERR

The most important thing I learned from my father was that hard work always pays off. The entertainment industry uses people up very quickly.

For someone to last a decade, let alone six of them, as he did, was remarkable, but he started the hard way. At the beginning of his career, he sang in small night clubs for tips or nothing at all, just to get himself known, and he believed I should also make my own way.

I started playing piano aged five and studied music at university, but I learned most of what I know from working with other musicians, rather than from my father. He offered me no introductions to influential friends and I didn't ask for any.

I had to find my own path to earn his respect.

I sound like my father when I sing and the older I get, the more I'm told we look alike, too, though our personalities are very different. I don't crave the spotlight in the way he did.

There are too many sacrifices that go along with it. There is always a price to pay. In 1963, when I was 19, I was kidnapped at gunpoint and my father paid a [pounds sterling]130,000 ransom demand.

After that, there were many who thought the event was a publicity stunt.

Unfortunately, it has thrown doubt on my integrity and will stay with me for the rest of my life.

The thing I admired most about my father was his loyalty.

He had a lot of famous friends. I remember being in my 20s when he took me to the Players Club on Sunset Strip, Los Angeles, to meet Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth. Some of the people he cared about were popular, like Sammy Davis Jr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

My Daddy Told Me; FRANK SINATRA JR Was Six When His Famous Father Divorced His Mother to Wed Ava Gardner. He Tells PAULA KERR How, after Years Apart, He Became His Dad's Music Manager
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.