Pick of the Night:

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Pick of the Night:


Byline: TERRY RAMSEY

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation

9pm, Five

It all goes horribly wrong for the CSI team tonight. Because after a particularly headline-grabbing murder - a renowned criminal lawyer is killed, tied to the back of her son's wedding car and dragged along like an empty beer can - they lose all the evidence.

Or to be more precise, Nick loses the evidence. He puts it in his car and instead of going straight to the lab, stops off at a diner. And while he's in there, his car is stolen.

Whoops.

As Grissom (William L Petersen, right) neatly summarises: "Even if we recover the vehicle, the chain of custody has been broken, so all the evidence has been compromised.

No judge will allow any of it to be admitted in court. Also, we released the crime scene, so it too is compromised. Leaving us nothing to go back for." Double whoops.

So, what does TV's top forensics squad rely on when there's no evidence?

Why, flashbacks, of course.

We get to see each of the team's recollections of evidence-gathering (the most entertaining is Greg Sanders's, who sees himself as a Raymond Chandler-style investigator) and, of course, the case is solved.

It's a very smart, pleasedwithitself episode, but highly entertaining and slickly done, as ever.

World Cup 06

7pm, ITV1 (kick-off 8pm)

Yes, we've got six points and, yes, we're through to the next phase, which is all that matters inside the simple, neatly ordered mind of Sven-Goran Eriksson (I imagine it as a large domed space, totally white, and dotted with pieces of uncomfortable-looking Ikea furniture ... but maybe that's just me).

However, most England fans will be hoping that this final group game is the one where the team get it together and show us what they can do.

And give Sweden a jolly good tonking.

But the chances of that happening tonight are ... well, just about zero.

Sven (right) is not a man for cavalier free-flowing style, even though we've qualified; and Sweden will be battling for a win to secure their own place in the next round. Besides, England-Sweden games nearly always end as boring draws. We haven't beaten them for an astonishing 38 years.

On the other hand, we might not actually want a win. By the time this match kicks off, we will know the result of Germany's game against Ecuador (ko 3pm) and what has to be done to avoid a next-round meeting with the old enemy - which may mean something less than victory.

Steve Rider and his amazing hair are presenting, and Terry Venables, Sam Allardyce and Stuart Pearce get to wear the silly microphones and perch on those uncomfortable looking stools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pick of the Night:
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.