Brazil Experiences the Growing Pains of Affirmative Action: Opinions Vary on Whether Policy Helps or Hinders Black Hispanics in Higher Education

By Roberge, Nicole | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, June 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Brazil Experiences the Growing Pains of Affirmative Action: Opinions Vary on Whether Policy Helps or Hinders Black Hispanics in Higher Education


Roberge, Nicole, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


LOS ANGELES

In order to qualify for affirmative action programs in Brazil, Blacks must submit a photo of themselves to a race board, whose members determine the applicants true color.

Although being classified Black affords them an opportunity at a college education, racism still makes it a difficult path to take. Many Black applicants try to identify themselves as White to avoid the stigma and backlash generally associated with affirmative action.

Ethnic inequality is still a day to day reality in Brazil, especially economically. Blacks and "mulattos" earn half the income of Whites. In 2001, Black men earned 30 percent less than White women. The country implemented the college affirmative action policies in the hopes of enhancing educational opportunities for Blacks and dosing the socioeconomic gap between the races. A 2000 census by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics found that Whites over the age of 25 received degrees at a rate five times greater than that of Blacks and native Brazilians of the same age.

Since the expansion of affirmative action, many more Blacks now have the ability to go to school, but opinions vary on whether affirmative action helps or hinders Black Hispanics in higher education. Brazil's infant affirmative action program was among the hot topics at a recent conference at the University of California, Los Angeles, titled "Race and Democracy: New Challenges in the Americas"

Students who are gaining access to higher education find themselves in an uncomfortable place: They are studying under scholars who are not happy with the change, according to surveys.

"Many public universities and other sectors that have traditionally excluded Afro-Brazilians still refuse to implement those policies, and Black organizations are currently in battle with them" says Raquel de Souza, a teaching assistant in social anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin, who was a student and teacher in Brazil and is now studying in the United States on a Fulbright Scholarship to establish comparisons between the educational systems in both countries.

"We are talking about centuries of socio economic exclusion here and these policies have been in place in a few institutions only in the last four or five years," she says.

That schools are now reserving slots for Black students doesn't sit well with the students, nor their detractors. De Souza says students feel uncomfortable being "given" this opportunity through quotas.

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