Has Sacked Home Secretary Charles Clarke Delivered the Death Blow to Tony Blair?

Daily Mail (London), June 27, 2006 | Go to article overview

Has Sacked Home Secretary Charles Clarke Delivered the Death Blow to Tony Blair?


Byline: JANE MERRICK;TIM SHIPMAN

CHARLES Clarke dealt a devastating blow to Tony Blair's hopes of clinging to power last night.

The former Home Secretary said the Prime Minister had 'lost his sense of purpose and direction'.

In the most damaging assault yet on Mr Blair's credibility by a former high ranking minister, Mr Clarke questioned whether he could recover enough authority to survive in office another year.

He called for Mr Blair to set a timetable for his departure to end the speculation about a handover to Gordon Brown. And he appeared to nail his colours to the Chancellor's mast by saying he would be 'happy' to see him in Downing Street.

Mr Clarke's attack on his former boss was seen as revenge for his sacking as Home Secretary last month.

Westminster was awash with rumours that he plans to emulate Geoffrey Howe, the former Chancellor whose devastating indictment of Margaret Thatcher in 1990 triggered her downfall.

Mr Blair ousted Mr Clarke - one of his most loyal ministers - over his handling of the scandal of 1,000 foreign prisoners wrongly freed instead of being deported.

Yesterday Mr Clarke broke his silence in a series of interviews that sparked Downing Street fears that he is trying to precipitate Mr Blair's downfall.

He told the Times: 'I do think there is a sense of Tony having lost his sense of direction, so my advice to him is to recover his sense of purpose and direction and that remains the best option'.

Alternatively, he said, the situation could be resolved 'by Gordon being elected with that sense of leadership and direction himself, and offering that to the party and the country.' In another interview, to be broadcast today on Radio 4's On The Ropes, he said he doubts Mr Blair can carry on after being damaged by recent events.

Mr Clarke said he believed Mr Blair should have announced a departure date of 2008 when he made clear he would not fight a fourth General Election.

Interviewed for BBC2's Newsnight last night, he accused the Premier of sacking him for 'political expediency' rather than long-term reform of the Home Office.

Mr Clarke also accused Mr Blair of reneging on a deal that he would stay as Home Secretary for up to four years. He said: 'When I was appointed in 2005 we agreed it would take three or four years to make the changes that were necessary.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Has Sacked Home Secretary Charles Clarke Delivered the Death Blow to Tony Blair?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.