Fiona Banner: Tracy Williams, Ltd

By Pasquariello, Lisa | Artforum International, Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

Fiona Banner: Tracy Williams, Ltd


Pasquariello, Lisa, Artforum International


As if Bouvard and Pecuchet (1881) rewound, Fiona Banner's work of the past twelve years has generally begun with copying and ended with epistemological inquiry. The profusion of words in earlier projects--which have included voluminous transcriptions of films such as Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Don't Look Back (1967), and a "totally unedited" thousand-page book, Nam, 1997, chronicling the on-screen action in six Vietnam movies--recalled Gustave Flaubert's assiduous copyists, who don't discriminate between "the good and the evil" and "the farcical and the sublime" because, as they conclude, "The page must be filled." For her recent dual-venue show at Tracy Williams, Ltd., Banner aimed to master two disparate, if thematically linked, bodies of knowledge. In a rented space in TriBeCa, "Parade" took on the military, specifically all of the world's fighter planes, while the subject under consideration at the gallery's West Village quarters was the nude, specifically the problem of its verbal approximation.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

It's tempting to tag "Parade" as the boy's show and "Nude" as the girl's show, but the gender-politics undercurrents are ultimately less resonant than her taxonomic investigations of them. As in her "still films," she is fascinated with what can and cannot be put into words, with the subjectivity resident in the ostensibly objective formats of the list and the catalogue, with what goes missing in the acts of describing or naming. The TriBeCa show's multimedia installation effected the conceptual distinction between an object, its linguistic signifier, and its representation. Sixty of Banner's Fighter Plane drawings, which she has been working on since 1986, were tacked to two abutting walls; nearby, Parade, 2006, a set of models of all 159 fighter jets currently in commission anywhere in the world hung from the ceiling, bathed in a projected list of their names. This surfeit of information shored up its own lacunae: Several of the accomplished drawings feature representations of newspaper headlines, but the words (AIRSTRIKE, 48 HOURS OF FIGHTING) are fragmented and often reversed, and the models, monochrome miniatures stirring gently in errant drafts, are devoid of any legible text relating their provenance or purpose: Which one of these is the Bronco, the Enforcer, the Super-stallion? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fiona Banner: Tracy Williams, Ltd
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.