American Library Association Would like to Thank Its 2005-2006 Library Champions

American Libraries, June-July 2006 | Go to article overview

American Library Association Would like to Thank Its 2005-2006 Library Champions


The American Library Association (ALA) is the voice of America's libraries, and our voice has been strengthened by the investments of ALA's core group of corporate supporters, the Library Champions. Over the years, corporate leaders have increasingly recognized the dynamic role libraries play in businesses, schools, colleges, communities virtual and real--everywhere people come together with a shared purpose and an interest in understanding the world around them. Today, the focus of the Association is to continue to build key partnerships between America's libraries and the corporate community that share a forward-looking vision of innovative service consistent with the values of the American Library Association.

Because of our pride of partnership, ALA is introducing a new Library Champions logo designed to proudly express and embody the essence of ALA's corporate supporters. The new Library Champions' logo builds upon our previous logo, slightly retaining the champion figure in addition to adding the phrase 'Investing in America's Libraries.' "We want our members to know who our Library Champions are and what they represent," says Joan Claffey, Director of the Office of Development at ALA. The new visual identity of the Library Champions represents ALA's renewed commitment and focus on our corporate partners as catalysts for advocating the value of libraries to the communities they serve. This new logo will be fully featured throughout ALA's conferences and exhibiting Champions booths. We encourage our ALA members and the library community to please thank them for their support.

David A. Pointon, Industry & Government Business Manager

3M LIBRARY SYSTEMS

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

For over 35 years 3M has been partnering with libraries to help them successfully meet the changing needs of their customers and to create a more 'human' library for them. In addition to providing innovative security, productivity and information management solutions that free librarians to be librarians by allowing them to spend more time helping customers, we strive to give back to libraries some of the support they've given us these many years.

As a Library Champion, and as a founding partner of the "@ your library[R]" campaign, 3M is also committed to helping increase public awareness of the vitality and value of today's libraries globally, and to keeping them up to date on the latest tools for creating their own marketing, public relations and advocacy programs.

FOUNDED: 1902

CONTACT: Shelly Niebur 651.733.8141

www.3M.com/us/library

George Coe, President, Baker & Taylor Institutional

BAKER & TAYLOR

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Baker & Taylor's products and services are designed with you, our customer, in mind. We have over 178 years of experience serving libraries around the world. Since 1828, we have brought libraries the widest range of product offerings in the industry, as well as value-added and customized services to meet your needs, and ultimately, the needs of your patrons. Today, we are committed to developing new programs and services that are in-step with today's technology and the changing needs of you and your patrons. By providing superior service and support, we are helping to ensure that your library remains a champion in your community.

FOUNDED: 1828

CONTACT: Information Services 800.775.1800 or btinfo@btol.com

www.btol.com

Bob Sibert, President

BOUND TO STAY BOUND BOOKS

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

For over 85 years our company has put children's books in our unique binding so they are durable enough to withstand the heavy circulation they get in schools and public libraries. Our company's mission to help librarians put quality books in their libraries has not wavered since my grandfather founded the company.

Bound to Stay Bound has tried to support ALA, librarians and libraries in other ways through the years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

American Library Association Would like to Thank Its 2005-2006 Library Champions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.