Hope and History in the Hills of Ohio

By Anyaso, Hilary Hurd | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, June 15, 2006 | Go to article overview

Hope and History in the Hills of Ohio


Anyaso, Hilary Hurd, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


When senior writer Ronald Roach traveled to Ohio to visit the 150-year-old historically Black Wilberforce University, he wondered what he would encounter to connect him to the pre-Civil War history of the institution. Though few landmarks provided visual dues to Wilberforce's long history, he says he was struck by the palpable family spirit conveyed by the students, faculty and administrators at the oldest, fully private Black higher education institution in the United States. But while Wilberforce is the oldest, it wasn't the first. Lincoln University and Cheyney University of Pennsylvania both opened before Wilberforce, but neither is currently considered a fully private university.

Having previously met Wilberforce's president, the Rev. Dr. Floyd Flake, when he was a U.S. congressman representing a Queens, N.Y., district, Ronald saw him recently not as an ex-politician nostalgic about his Capitol Hill days, but as the maverick economic and educational leader he's been virtually his entire career. In "An HBCU Transformed," Ronald reports that Flake's administration has restored financial health to the small southwestern Ohio school, which enrolled some 800 residential undergraduates this past academic year. Four years ago, Flake and his staff found Wilberforce to be $5 million in debt while operating on an $18 million annual budget. With prudent fiscal management, staff cuts and aggressive fund raising, Wilberforce celebrates its 150th year with a clean bill of health and is poised for future growth.

Speaking of finances, Diverse correspondent Peter Galuszka examines how some colleges are looking to cash in on the high risk, high reward world of hedge funds in "Risky Business." These funds remain shrouded in mystery, in part because they operate largely outside of federal securities laws, and because they generally only accept financially sophisticated investors--setting them apart from mutual funds.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hope and History in the Hills of Ohio
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.