Proud Palestinians of Chile

By Holston, Mark | Americas (English Edition), November-December 2005 | Go to article overview

Proud Palestinians of Chile


Holston, Mark, Americas (English Edition)


AN OLD PROVERB IN CHILE goes that every small village in the country is sure to have three-things--a priest, a policeman, and a Palestinian. Surprisingly, this South American nation, the most distant point on earth from the Middle East, has become home to one of the largest populations of Palestinians outside of their ancestral homeland. Today an estimated 350,000 Chileans out of a population of about 16 million can trace their ancestry to Palestine. Significantly, this community of Christian Palestinians now outnumbers by three times those who have remained in the Middle East.

Evidence of the Palestinian presence is everywhere to be found in the Chilean capital of Santiago. One of the city's most prestigious social clubs is the expansive Club Palestino, where well-heeled Chilean Palestinians gather to play tennis, swim, dine, and engage in social activities in lavish salons decorated with Persian rugs and ornate Middle Eastern furniture and art. The members of one of Chile's professional soccer teams, Palestino, sport jerseys emblazoned with the traditional Palestinian colors--red, green, and white. Restaurants that offer a taste of the Middle East abound, from the ritzy Club Arabe, one of the finest eateries in the seaside resort city of Vina del Mar, to such Santiago establishments as Abu El Kef, Omar Khayyam, and La Turquita. On the narrow streets of Patronato, Santiago's traditional Palestinian neighborhood near the city's historic center, signs in Arabic are as common as those in Spanish, and a steady stream of visitors come to shop in the bazaar-like collection of small shops and arcades. The barrio's San Jorge Cathedral, with its classic orthodox facade, is the Palestinian community's religious focal point.

The initial wave of immigrants came in the 1850s, during the Crimean War. The first to arrive were merchants and farmers who found abundant opportunity to prosper economically in Chile, whose climate and terrain reminded them of their homeland. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Proud Palestinians of Chile
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.