George Washington; 'A Good and a Great Man'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

George Washington; 'A Good and a Great Man'


Byline: Peter A. Lillback, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In these politically correct times, George Washington isn't the hero he once was.

Children don't read about him in school as much as their parents did. They're much more likely to learn about African-American, Native American or female heroes.

New Jersey, in fact, issued new history standards a few years ago that omitted any mention of Washington.

Even when children do learn about him, it's in an article in a boring textbook or a static image in a painting. There are no radio, TV or video clips that would make him come alive.

Washington's stature has diminished so much that a recent Washington College Poll found that Americans had a higher respect for Bill Clinton's job performance as president than they did for George Washington's.

As we once again celebrate our nation's birthday, it's time to rediscover Washington, the role model.

From his earliest childhood, through his youth, military career, political career and retirement, Washington was a model of Christian virtues strength and humility, servanthood and leadership, principles and forgiveness.

A man of character.

"First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in the humble and endearing scenes of private life," Maj. Gen. Henry Lee said at Washington's funeral. "Pious, just, humane, temperate and sincere; uniform, dignified and commanding, his example was edifying to all around him, as were the effects of that example lasting." How many recent statesmen have been widely described with words like these? The geniuses of Washington's age, people like Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, looked to him for leadership. Jefferson said that Washington's mind wasn't of the very first order, but "his integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known .. He was a good, and a great, man." As Washington's army suffered defeat after humiliating defeat on the road to Yorktown, he refused to give up and inspired others to do the same. When all seemed lost in the cold and deprivation of Valley Forge, his example galvanized his beleaguered army. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

George Washington; 'A Good and a Great Man'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.