Yale Fanatics for Diversity Stifle Liberty

By Gardiner, Nile; Armel, Michael Scott | Insight on the News, January 3, 1994 | Go to article overview
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Yale Fanatics for Diversity Stifle Liberty


Gardiner, Nile, Armel, Michael Scott, Insight on the News


In February, a visiting delegation of distinguished Chinese professor was surprised to see the campus statute of Yale University's first rector, the Rev. Abraham Pierson, plastered with homosexual posters. One of the professors, clearly shocked by what he saw, asked, "Have the students here no respect for their past?" A somewhat embarrassed student tour guide was forced to concede that they don't

Yale's first 13 president (until 1745 called rectors), from Pierson to Timothy Dwight, all carried the title "the reverend." They no doubt would turn in their graves if they could see their university today.

Yale is leading the way in fostering what could be termed a multisexual culture. The office of the provost, Judith Rodin (appointed president of the University of Pennsylvania in December), established an eight-member Gay and Lesbian Research Fund Committee, already endowed with $250,000. Preparations are under way for a lesbian and gay studies program, which would include endowed professorships, visiting scholar programs and funds for dissertation research. The committee alreaydy holds a gay and lesbian studies lecture series and this semester circulated a list of 70 Yale courses relevant to homosexual studies.

The university-funded Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Co-Operative sponsors dances that draw 1,000 students, according to the Yale Daily News. This is a large figure considering that there are 10,000 students at Yale.

Every year the co-op holds a week of Bisexual, Gay and Lesbian Awareness Days - BGLADS. In 1993 they sponsored a pornographic magazine, My Tongue, produced by Yale students. The magazine, illustrated with explicit photographs of homosexual acts, was distributed all over campus in locations easily accessible to minors. More than 100 copies of My Tongue lay for at least two weeks outside the office of then-Graduate School Dean Richard Levin. Despite pleas for the magazine's removal, Levin chose not to take action against the publication or its editors. And although the publication clearly contravened Connecticut's obscenity laws, Yale police turned a blind eye, fearing repercussions from the gay community if they made arrests.

Yale's support for the homosexual community is part of its wider policy of multiculturalism, which has resulted in radical changes in the admissions process, student life and curriculum.

The university has 53 officials responsible for overseeing affirmative action programs. This includes 10 affirmative action deputies, 11 minority student coordinators, five human relations counselors, 13 Title IX coordinators and 14 appointees to the Staff Affirmative Action Advisory Committee. But its aggressive affirmative action policy has produced a racially discriminatory selection system that patronizes ethnic minorities and makes a mockery of the principle of equality of opportunity.

Instead of promoting interracial harmony, Yale is fostering cultural disunity and "separate development" through its policy of appointing ethnic deans to run racially segregated cultural houses. The list of cultural houses at Yale reads like an apartheid handbook: Chicano, Puerto Rican, African-American, Asian-American and so on. Yale has become a training ground for ethnic separatists.

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