Using Digital Cameras for Multidimensional Learning in K-12 Classrooms

By Supon, Viola | Journal of Instructional Psychology, June 2006 | Go to article overview

Using Digital Cameras for Multidimensional Learning in K-12 Classrooms


Supon, Viola, Journal of Instructional Psychology


Digital cameras are educational tools that support purposeful instruction with a clear vision on curriculum, instruction, assessment, and reflection. This article explains the impact of digital cameras in today's classrooms, indicates effective usage of digital cameras, and relates how multidimensional learning can be provided for students by using digital cameras.

**********

As classrooms continue to be infused with various forms of technology, teachers need to recognize the role digital cameras play in student performance and the multiple dimensions this instructional tool does to enrich learning. According to Education World (2005, p. 1), "teachers across the country and around the world are discovering the many valuable uses for digital cameras; uses that both engage students and make their own professional lives easier." Further, "students embrace the creativity and assessment opportunities that digital photos offer" (Lindroth, 2004, p. 22). Therefore, it is astute of teachers to maximize and have digital cameras integrated in the classrooms for students to increase their learning and achievement.

This article: (1) explains the impact of digital cameras in today's classrooms, (2) indicates effective usage of digital cameras, and (3) relates how multidimensional learning can be provided for students by using digital cameras.

Impact of Digital Cameras

As stated by Rivard (2004, p. 55) "digital cameras have become the hottest tech trend in K-12 districts today." This is attributed to students being more visual because of their familiarity with video games, computers, and movies.

Since individuals are "intensely visual" (Wolfe, 2001, p. 152), the researcher notes that more details and data are obtained visually than any of the other senses. In essence, she emphasizes "a picture is worth at least 10,000 words" (p. 152). This is of particular importance since usage of images is more prevalent in our society. Teachers need to adapt their instructional methods to enhance the visual literacy abilities of students while enabling learners to develop higher level thinking processes (Cooper, 2003; Wilhelm, 2005).

Further, Roblyer and Edwards (2000) explain that visual literacy skills will have even greater demands for students entering the workforce as modern society advances. Then, from an instructional stance, digital cameras have value and do have a positive impact on learning.

Effective Usage of Digital Cameras

Consider the usage of digital cameras to determine the extent of how the usage is aligned with the curriculum, one's teaching, and the classroom assessments. This consideration is important because of the recent emphasis on curriculum and state mandated tests. It is suggested that judgments be made about how well the digital camera usage matches these areas. It is recommended that digital usage match well with these areas because a strong alignment yields noted results.

Another consideration is that teachers abide by school district policy and make certain the available documentation is in place before allowing individuals to be photographed. Further, teachers should stress the importance of taking appropriate images. Establishing guidelines with students' input assists them in being selective about their photographs.

Rairigh and Kirby (2002, p. 36) point out teachers' responsibilities include: (a) providing the instructional tasks for the students' engagement, (b) providing an understanding and knowledge base for the use of digital cameras, (c) providing access and instructions to students for the handling and use of this technology, and (d) providing instruction and guidelines for using this technology to provide feedback.

Thus, it is critical that planning and time be spent discussing the basic photography guidelines. In regards to effective usage of digital photos, teachers and students must learn to be deliberate and resourceful when it comes to printing and using the images produced. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using Digital Cameras for Multidimensional Learning in K-12 Classrooms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.