Regular Day at Gay Games except for a Few Protesters, Proponents of Crystal Lake Event Happy It Was like Any Other Day at the Beach

By St. Clair, Stacy | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

Regular Day at Gay Games except for a Few Protesters, Proponents of Crystal Lake Event Happy It Was like Any Other Day at the Beach


St. Clair, Stacy, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Stacy St. Clair Daily Herald Staff Writer

Toni Weaver didn't know what to expect when she arrived at Crystal Lake Sunday morning for the 2006 Gay Games rowing competition.

In the months leading up to the event, a heated - and often vitriolic - debate had ensued about its appropriateness.

Would, as some opponents predicted, Crystal Lake turn its back on the Games? Or would it welcome the competition as if it were another day at the beach?

Weaver, the president of Parents, Friends and Families of Lesbians and Gays' McHenry County chapter, saw her answer as soon as she walked into the park. The owners of several lake homes were flying rainbow flags, a symbol of gay rights, from their docks and boats.

"It brought a tear to my eye," she said. "I had been afraid about how things would go today. It just lifted my spirit."

Police and fire department officials reported no problems or arrests Sunday. In fact, once inside the park's gates, it seemed like an ordinary day on Crystal Lake.

Local families picnicked along the shore, as others waded into water to seek refuge from the scalding sun. The 65 athletes registered for the event, meanwhile, practiced in lake and socialized with spectators.

It was, in the end, the peaceful image proponents painted when they lobbied to hold the games here.

"It's just another day at the beach," said John Cepek, the incoming president of the national PFLAG organization. "This shows lesbians and gays are like everyone else. They've been coming to beaches with their families and blending in for years."

The Games, a weeklong event that the Chicago area is hosting for the first time, comes at a critical moment in the Gay Rights movement. Bans against same-sex marriage have fueled debate and, in some cases legal action, in Congress and 19 states including Illinois.

The tension surrounding the hot-button issue was apparent in March, when the Crystal Lake park board voted to allow the rowing competition. Opponents booed the decision, calling it a sin against God and suggesting the competition would promote promiscuity.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Regular Day at Gay Games except for a Few Protesters, Proponents of Crystal Lake Event Happy It Was like Any Other Day at the Beach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.