Itai Doron

By Corris, Michael | Artforum International, November 1993 | Go to article overview

Itai Doron


Corris, Michael, Artforum International


Here's the pitch: Guy Debord meets Marshall McLuhan. The interior monologue of a star-struck Hollywood foundling begins its expansion to infinity. The attack of the 50-foot notion. We find ourselves trapped in a 12,000-square-foot projection of Itai Doron's imaginative neural network. This is the body electric, and he sings with a vengeance. This is The Immaculate Stereoscopic Conception of Mr. D., 1993. Across town, in the impeccably Modernist White Cube, a more modest exhibition concentrating on Mr. D.'s primal media recollections is on offer. Titled "The Secret Life and Archaic Times of Mr. D.," these close-to-puerile photomontages throb in unison to the Dockland's beat of Doron's inverted Global Village.

Episode I: We are on the threshold. As we watch Clive Crawford of the dance group DV-8 writhe to the beat of a different drummer, Grace Slick belts out her anthem to other leaves of grass. We all begin to sink slowly into the ooze of someone else's bummer. Night descends--and the Warholesque eclipse that seems to be eternity's breath is shattered by Mr. D.'s insistent cardiac superpositions. "Over the Shadows," 1993, and White Rabbit Revival, 1991--92 (36 luminous silk-screened paintings in the manner of Andy Warhol and a videotape, respectively) are the interface that ebbs and flows over us like the surf over Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr in From Here to Eternity. We long to be engulfed, made oceanic and whole, by this consciousness of Doron's but the props that embrace us distract us as well.

Episode II: What we have suspected and feared is true: the quickening pulse of Mr. D.'s life-force and mind-field signals the fragmentation and reduction of ours. Mama Cass is trapped in a plastic blizzard; looking for all the world like that last lump of flour refusing to disperse in our psychic vortex. No one can save her, but we can follow her gaze. Cass's line of sight glances off Otis Redding, himself totally wired for sound. Asleep--or just meditating? or stoned?--in a crystal cradle, good vibrations are lovingly bestowed upon the infant Mr.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Itai Doron
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.