Sudan Could Tap "Marine Capital."

By Hoes, Jeanne | African Business, January 1994 | Go to article overview

Sudan Could Tap "Marine Capital."


Hoes, Jeanne, African Business


Sudan is one of the countries which, according to a World Bank study, are particularly well placed to make use of their "marine capital". The sea offers a treasure chest of potential clues for solving some of humanity's worsening problems, the study contends.

Investing more in marine research and in the growing field of marine "biotechnology" could deliver big payoffs, especially for poorer developing countries which need the help the most.

"Enormous promise"

"The tremendous diversity of life in tropical and subtropical seas represents the world's most abundant but least utilised living resources," the study maintains. Entitled Marine Biotechnology and Developing Countries, the study adds that "while biotechnology undoubtedly holds enormous promise for developing countries", much more needs to be done to reap those rewards.

Marine biotechnology, or the use of science to produce goods and services from marine life, could be a boon, especially for those developing countries with long coastlines, the study contends. Island countries such as Haiti, Indonesia and the Philippines and coastal countries like Chile, China, India and Sudan all stand to gain from drawing more on their "marine capital".

Fighting disease

Through marine biotechnology, developing nations can produce variations of species that could boost food supplies, improve the nutritional status of their populations and notch up export earnings. Learning more about marine life could also yield compounds that can fight diseases in humans and in valuable sea creatures, such as shrimp. Shrimp is already a major source of revenue for Mozambique.

Developing countries could also use marine biotechnology to find micro-organisms that help break down pollutants and waste in water without leaving toxic residues. Some marine life could also help industry. Currently, scientists are seeking a substance that could help rid ship hulls of encrustation instead of applying protective paints which leach heavy metals into the water.

Applying lessons from marine life can also help to improve land crops. For example, natural antifreeze found in flounders that live in extremely cold water has already been blended into varieties of tomatoes to protect them from freezing.

But despite the promise which marine biotechnology holds for developing countries, much work lies ahead, the study cautions. International agencies like the World Bank, it urges, must help developing countries to improve their ability to do research and development and then use that know-how in their economies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sudan Could Tap "Marine Capital."
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.