Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Linked to Behavioral Ills: In Adolescents, Skills for Academic Achievement and Social Interaction Were Found to Be Greatly Impaired

By Bates, Betsy | Clinical Psychiatry News, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Linked to Behavioral Ills: In Adolescents, Skills for Academic Achievement and Social Interaction Were Found to Be Greatly Impaired


Bates, Betsy, Clinical Psychiatry News


SANTA BARBARA, CALIF. -- The psychiatric and behavioral consequences of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure on children are abundantly clear by mid-childhood and adolescence, based on studies presented at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism.

One study found that children exposed prenatally to alcohol were far more likely than their peers to meet the diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, tic disorders, and mood disorders by the time they were 8-14 years old.

Another study assessed social problem-solving skills and executive functioning in adolescents who were heavily exposed to alcohol in utero. Profound impairments were found in both types of skills, which are integral to academic achievement and social interaction.

The studies were conducted by researchers from the Center for Behavioral Teratology at San Diego State University and were presented in poster form.

Sarah N. Mattson, Ph.D., a senior author on the studies, said in an interview that "heavy alcohol exposure" was equivalent to about a case of beer or a fifth of hard liquor a day.

Susanna L. Fryer, a doctoral student at the center, explored childhood psychopathologies in 43 alcohol-exposed and 22 nonexposed children using structured interviews with primary caregivers.

"The difference within the ADHD category was, by far, the largest [group] effect observed," she concluded. By the numbers, 42 of 43 alcohol-exposed children met diagnostic criteria for ADHD, compared with 1 of 22 nonexposed children matched by age and socioeconomic status.

Nearly a third (13 of 43) of the alcohol-exposed children had oppositional defiant disorder, but just one nonexposed child met the criteria for that diagnosis. Mood disorders were found in eight alcohol-exposed children, tic disorders in four, and conduct disorder in five. No child in the control group met the diagnostic criteria for any of those illnesses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Linked to Behavioral Ills: In Adolescents, Skills for Academic Achievement and Social Interaction Were Found to Be Greatly Impaired
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.