Psychosis Diagnosis Needs to Be Revisited over Time

By Sherman, Carl | Clinical Psychiatry News, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Psychosis Diagnosis Needs to Be Revisited over Time


Sherman, Carl, Clinical Psychiatry News


NEW YORK -- The diagnosis of psychosis cannot be made on the basis of a single clinical encounter. "You have to look at the whole course" to distinguish among the various psychotic disorders and bipolar disorder, Ronald Rieder, M.D., said at a conference on schizophrenia sponsored by Columbia University.

In many cases, the diagnosis, which is essential for an appropriate treatment plan and an accurate prognosis, must be regarded as a work in progress that is subject to revision as more information becomes available, said Dr. Rieder of the university.

Although all psychotic disorders share many symptoms, they may be distinguished from one another on the basis of specific manifestations, associated psychiatric symptoms, and the course of the illness.

Duration is a critical factor in making the formal distinction among disorders that otherwise might appear to be identical. The diagnosis of schizophrenia, for example, requires symptoms to be present for at least 6 months.

If a patient is seen before then, schizophreniform disorder would be an appropriate diagnosis--subject to change if symptoms persist and are accompanied by a decline in function.

Psychotic symptoms lasting less than a month, unrelated to drugs or a medical condition and without apparent deterioration, are accurately termed brief psychotic disorder, Dr. Rieder said at the meeting, which was cosponsored by the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Delusional disorder, an infrequent diagnosis, is marked by delusions of at least a month's duration unaccompanied by other psychotic symptoms. The delusions are "nonbizarre"--false beliefs that do not fall outside the realm of possibility, such as delusions of jealousy or erotomania.

The mixture of psychosis and affective symptoms can particularly complicate diagnosis. Psychotic symptoms are present in one-half to two-thirds of patients with bipolar disorder but only during mood episodes (depressive or manic).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Psychosis Diagnosis Needs to Be Revisited over Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.