BOOK REVIEWS: The History of Dogs in Paint; Best in Show - the Dog in Art from the Renaissance to Today, by William Secord et Al Yale, Pounds 25

The Birmingham Post (England), August 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

BOOK REVIEWS: The History of Dogs in Paint; Best in Show - the Dog in Art from the Renaissance to Today, by William Secord et Al Yale, Pounds 25


Byline: by Richard Edmonds

Whether you race dogs, show them, or simply cuddle them, this book, with its historical range from the Dark Ages onwards, is a must-have.

All kinds of painters are represented here in stunning colour plates which show the changing face of the denizens of the doggie kingdom.

They range from overworked mutts of the 15th Century, who did everything from turning cooking spits to pulling work carts, to the chic canine aristocrats of the 18th century French court.

These were the hunting dogs, beloved of the kings of France who sported elegant names (no doubt on gold collars) such as Pompee or Florissant. Here were dogs every bit as snobbish as their masters, patrons who invited the best artists of the day to take a likeness of their pampered pooches.

Portraits of dogs go back a long way into early history and they appear at the court of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. In fact, an illustration in this fascinating book, shows a cave painting from the Arabian desert which is at least 5,000 years old and depicts a hunter setting his dog onto an ostrich.

If archaeology interests you, then you may be keen to know that the creature which lollops around your house, leaving hairs all over the furniture along with demands to be taken out with its pooper-scooper twice a day, is our oldest non-human companion, with wolves as its actual ancestors.

Wolf skulls found in Paleolithic caves in southern France, indicate that humans and wolves have shared territory for more than a 100,000 years.

In fact, the oldest bone of an animal whose teeth are distinctly dog-like dates back 14,000 years and was found in Germany with a counterpart discovered in Iraq and Israel.

It is curious to think that the pampered, vaguely smelly, darlings, that women cradle so lovingly to their breasts came from the wolf, the most feared animal humans have known, with its propensity to attack.

It's even more curious when you see that the great artists of the Renaissance could turn a favoured animal into a work of art.

Titian is especially featured here since he was instructed to incorporate a rather nice-looking dog into a 16th century portrait of Federico Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua.

Yet Titian's affectionate dog is no more appealing than the canine beauties painted by the great Jacopo Bassano at around the same time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BOOK REVIEWS: The History of Dogs in Paint; Best in Show - the Dog in Art from the Renaissance to Today, by William Secord et Al Yale, Pounds 25
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.