Angel Thoughts

Manila Bulletin, August 22, 2006 | Go to article overview

Angel Thoughts


Byline: Deedee Siytangco

"Worry is like a rocking chair;

It gives you something to do,

But it gets you nowhere.

So, leave your worries

And enjoy life's wonderful gifts!" Dolly Nazareno

Vancouver - I enjoyed our brief Seattle sojourn very much. With my I-9 visa to the US "alive from our previous border crossing it was faster to pass the immigration guard at the booth. He waved us through after checking our passports and forms. It was Sunday morning and we went back to the Pike Place Market and ogle the fresh seafoods, fruits and vegetables. I bought two lbs, of red cherries and ate them the whole day! Hubby used to spoil me and Sandee with red cherries, whether in Hongkong or here in Vancouver. It's too expensive in Manila, so "dito na lang."

My regret is that we don't have a Pike Place Market and a Pacific Science Center in Metro Manila. Two tourism destinations that can be done, albeit on a much smaller scale.

For US$10 each per adult and S 7 for Monchu, we went to the center which features hands-on scientific exhibits from dinosaurs (A Journey Through Time) to an Insect Village, an outdoor Water Works, Body Works. There is also an I Max theatre with several features, as well as a summer treat - the Bubbles Pond.

The last treat is an outdoor fun thing for kids and the young-at-heart. There are several stainless steel bowls filled with liquid soap. You dipped big plastic flyswatter like rings or heart and flower shapes in the liquid and lift them gently and voila! Soft multi-colored bubbles floating up the sky. Yes, I must confess... Monchu and I enjoyed ourselves making beautiful bubbles that afternoon.

The Water Works is an outdoor park that makes use of water jets, water canons and other simple mechanical works to demonstrate scientific theories that even children can understand. You can shoot water sprays and jets with a switch and its fun, fun, fun and educational too.

After a full afternoon, we drove back to Vancouver, stopping over at my cousin Bobby Ardena's home in Jackson Park. Bobby's mom, Mirita, our "Tita Mir" the only sister of my dad, Amado Munson, was one of wedding sponsors forty years ago. Bobby and his younger brother Johnny their eldest sister Tess ( now Mrs. Boy Reyes) and "Kuya" Sonny were some of our Munson cousins we grew up with in Manila.

They all migrated to North America, the boys to the Seattle area and Tess and Boy to Canada. Bobby married social worker Yolly in Manila and he migrated to the US to try his luck. Before that , he studied at the Philippine School for Interior Design in Makati and turned out cabinets and other furniture pieces. Yolly and their two children followed after a year. Their youngest, EJ, was born here twelve years ago.

Bobby, I am proud to say, is now an acknowledged wood veneer master craftsman in a Seattle-based company, Delta!

This firm makes super- luxurious interiors for multimillion dollar yatchs, and boasts of a waiting list of clients until several years from now, as each Delta yatch is a "signature' and can take up to two years in the making.

Bobby puts together the veneer wood paneling and furnishing, using mahogany, teak, maple and other beautiful woods . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Angel Thoughts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.