Cool Shoes

By Pope, Deborah C. | Arts & Activities, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Cool Shoes


Pope, Deborah C., Arts & Activities


Each year, I look for an enjoyable way to teach warm and cool colors to my fifth-grade art classes. I decided to incorporate a shoe-drawing lesson into a project I call "Cool Shoes." The students loved the idea.

I put a note in our faculty room asking staff members to donate any unwanted shoes. I received enough to fill a large box, allowing the students the option of picking a shoe from the box or using one of their own shoes as a model.

The students placed their chosen shoe on the table in front of them. Preliminary drawings were done on 9" x 12" manila paper. I encouraged the students to attempt to draw exactly what they saw and we discussed the term "realism." The project that preceded this one was an abstract cut paper project in the style of Henri Matisse, so the students were able to compare "realistic" and "abstract" styles in art.

Once the students' drawings of the shoes were completed, we discussed composing a background. We talked about the importance of selecting objects to put in or around the shoe that were appropriate in size. Students were tempted to put large animals in, so I suggested choosing an animal or object that could actually fit into a real shoe.

There was a lot of interaction and sharing of ideas when it was time to decide on a background. Students were allowed to be as creative and original as possible, resulting in shoes placed in trees, under the sea, on the beach, in the desert, on a desk holding pencils and just about anywhere else you can imagine.

The completed drawings were transferred from the manila paper to watercolor paper using graphite/transfer paper and ball-point pens. Once on the watercolor paper, the image was then outlined with an extra-fine-point permanent black marker.

Before we began painting, I demonstrated the different techniques for using and mixing watercolor paints. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cool Shoes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.