Electronic Commerce: Important Developments for the Future

By Harter, Gred | Business Credit, January 1994 | Go to article overview

Electronic Commerce: Important Developments for the Future


Harter, Gred, Business Credit


Many important developments have taken place that influence treasury and credit management functions. In the international arena, the international EDI language of electronic commerce, called the United Nations EDI for Administration, Commerce, and Transport (UN/EDIFACT), is now gaining momentum because several standard messages are available and are being used internationally. Companies in the U.S., seriously considering initiating an EDI strategy should understand UN/EDIFACT thoroughly.

Companies in countries where national standards have never existed are adopting UN/EDIFACT as their initial EDI standard of choice, for both domestic and international commerce.

Representatives from 25 countries attended the annual Electronic Data Interchange Association (EDIA) Users Conference held in conjunction with the EDI Council of Canada. Many of these countries have national EDI movements, and EDI associations are facilitating "doing business electronically." The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) has announced a World Symposium on Trade Efficiency, to be held in Columbus, Ohio in October of 1994. Ministers, chief executives, and senior officials from UNCTAD's 188 member countries will join to create an open and universal environment for efficient trade. The symposium will focus on new technologies in the fields of banking, insurance, transport, telecommunications, and information for trade. The promotion of international data exchange standards for electronic commerce will be a key component.

"Uncle Sam" Leads the EDI Way

What is happening closer to home? The federal government is becoming a major EDI user organization, which has implications for all of us. Uncle Sam now has senior management support from President Clinton. The implementation timetable is ambitious and aggressive. Several agencies already have implemented and integrated EDI into their processes such as the U.S. Customs Service and the Defense Logistics Agency of the Department of Defense. Movement of funds is a significant activity for these major government agencies, and collecting and disbursing electronically will, in all probability, be a future requirement.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Commerce: Important Developments for the Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.