Lobbyist Gets a Little Help from Friends

By Borders, Rebecca; Dockery, C. C. | Insight on the News, April 25, 1994 | Go to article overview

Lobbyist Gets a Little Help from Friends


Borders, Rebecca, Dockery, C. C., Insight on the News


Are major corporations hedging their bets by hiring Vice President Al Gore's best friend as a lobbyist?

And why would the Clinton administration appoint this lobbyist to a bipartisan, high-ranking congressional commission on entitlement reform?

With his one-year lobbying ban barely over, former New York Rep. Thomas J. Downey has rushed back through the revolving door and signed on to lobby Congress for some of America's biggest and best-known corporations. What makes Downey's new career so interesting is also what makes him so attractive to his new clients: His connections with the administration run deep.

Downey always has been vocal about his friendship with Gore. "The bitter irony about it is that my best friend just became the vice president, and I'm not going to be there to help him in the next Congress," Downey told the New York Times the night of his defeat.

However, it looks like Downey will be a player anyway. According to federal lobbying reports filed with the clerk of the House, Downey and his firm, Thomas J. Downey and Associates, have been hired by Time Warner for "all legislation affecting telecommunications and trade," by U.S. Healthcare and Medco Containment Services for "all legislation affecting health reform including the Health Security Act," and by Monitor Aerospace Corp. for "all legislation affecting defense conversion."

In addition, Downey's company has been retained by Metropolitan Life and Affiliated Cos. and Du Pont for "all legislation affecting environment and health care, including the superfund reauthorization and Health Security Act," by Breakthrough Technologies Institute for "all legislation affecting fuel cell technology and development," by Joseph E. Seagrams & Sons for "all legislation affecting excise taxes and trade," and by United Feather and Down for "all legislation affecting HR 1741," which is the duty-tax issue on imported feathers.

Downey is a onetime liberal wunderkind. Elected to the House at age 25, he made a name for himself as leading critic of the arms race and defender of the environment. He often was mentioned as a future chairman of the Ways and Means Committee and even as a possible presidential candidate. He served as the acting chairman of the Human Resources committee and a member of the Trade subcommittee--all of which Downey now will lobby on behalf of his new clients. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lobbyist Gets a Little Help from Friends
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.