Private Schools Keep Their Grip on Oxbridge Admissions

The Evening Standard (London, England), September 26, 2006 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Private Schools Keep Their Grip on Oxbridge Admissions


Byline: ELIZABETH HOPKIRK

LONDON'S private schools have maintained their grip on Oxbridge places despite attempts by the Government to encourage more state school children to apply.

An Evening Standard survey of 18 leading state and private schools in the capital has found that more than twice as many feepaying pupils as state school children will be starting at Oxbridge colleges next month.

Both state and independent schools have managed to get more pupils into the universities than last year but our analysis shows the private sector still maintains a firm hold on places.

In our snapshot survey 67 per cent of Oxbridge places went to private school pupils this year, compared with 70 per cent last year. State school pupils won 33 per cent of places this year, a marginal improvement on last year's 30 per cent.

Confirmed places were offered to 325 pupils at the private schools we spoke to, while only 159 were made to state pupils.

Campaigners for state education are disappointed. "There continues to be an uneven distribution of places at the two premier universities for pupils from state schools," said Olive Forsythe of the National Union of Teachers. "While attempts are being made to address it, more still needs to be done.

"With 93 per cent of children still going to state schools, the question has to be asked why does this disparity continue?

"The results at state schools are as good as independent schools. The causes are unclear. It may be that there is still a reluctance among young people in state schools to apply to Oxbridge, feeling they won't stand a chance.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Private Schools Keep Their Grip on Oxbridge Admissions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?