BLOOD MONEY; His Treachery Led to the Torture and Execution of Countless British Agents. Yet Outrageously the European Court of Human Rights Has Ruled That George Blake CAN Profit from His Betrayals

Daily Mail (London), September 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

BLOOD MONEY; His Treachery Led to the Torture and Execution of Countless British Agents. Yet Outrageously the European Court of Human Rights Has Ruled That George Blake CAN Profit from His Betrayals


Byline: ANDREW ROBERTS

HE WAS one of the most evil men to besmirch the post-war period. His coldhearted, deliberate actions led to the torture and murder of scores of brave men and women, putting him on the same moral plane as the lowest, twisted serial killer.

Yet on Monday, the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg ordained that British taxpayers' money should be paid to the Communist spy George Blake because Britain has breached his human rights - even though he is a convicted traitor and a fugitive from British justice.

George Blake, who secretly worked for the KGB while serving in MI6, during which time he copied 4,720 pages of secret intelligence for the Russians and betrayed the identities of around 400 MI6 agents, has been living in Moscow since his sensational escape from Wormwood Scrubs in 1966.

He is now 84 and lives on the pension of a colonel in Russian Intelligence.

He is also inordinately proud of having betrayed this country so comprehensively - and for so long.

What possible right, therefore, can Blake have to sue the British Government, and what can the judges of the European Court of Human Rights have been thinking when they awarded him damages against this country?

Moreover, what more will it take before this Government - which invited and encouraged the present flood of absurd human rights cases - puts patriotism, decency and common sense before its obsession with Europe?

The facts of the case are straightforward: born in 1922 to a Dutch mother and Egyptian father, George Blake (born Behar) was educated in Cairo and became active in the Dutch resistance during the Nazi occupation.

He escaped to London, disguised as a monk, and carried on working for Britain's Special Operations Executive, eventually joining MI6.

How he became a Marxist-Leninist is still open to doubt; he claimed it was due to his hatred of British snobbery and racism, and Churchill's socalled warmongering in the 'Iron Curtain' speech of 1946, in which he declared: 'From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent [of Europe].' Yet Rebecca West, in her book The Meaning Of Treason, pointed out that his conversion was likely to have been much earlier than that, probably during the war.

However it happened, by June 1950 Blake was captured by the North Koreans during the Korean War, where he had been sent by the Foreign Office as vice-consul.

He had become highly critical of the U.S. bombing campaign and was ready to sell his services.

Needless to say, Stalin's KGB took up his offer and ordered him to work for them while pretending to be loyal to MI6.

From the moment of his release by the North Koreans in 1953, and especially after he was posted by MI6 to Berlin in 1955, Blake passed everything he knew to his Soviet controllers.

Since his British job was to recruit Soviet officers as doubleagents, he was in the perfect position to damage the intelligencegathering effort of the West.

The MI6 chief Dick White later said that Blake did more damage even than Britain's most notorious Communist spy, Kim Philby.

FOR seven years, Blake systematically destroyed the network of agents who were working to bring democracy to Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.

Although the exact number is not known, several score of them paid with their lives, many after being tortured.

In 1960 Blake was finally unmasked due to information received from Michael Goleniewski, a Polish intelligence officer, and at his trial the following-year he was convicted of supplying the KGB with information that had led to the arrest and execution of 42 anti-Communist agents, although, in reality, there were many more.

In May 1961 he received a sentence of 42 years, the longest ever handed down by a British court.

Yet on October 22, 1966, aided by an Irishman named Sean Bourke, Blake escaped from Wormwood Scrubs over the prison wall and made his way to the USSR in the false floor of a camper van driven by two antinuclear activists, Pat Pottle and Michael Randle.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BLOOD MONEY; His Treachery Led to the Torture and Execution of Countless British Agents. Yet Outrageously the European Court of Human Rights Has Ruled That George Blake CAN Profit from His Betrayals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.