Small Business

By Babicky, Jacqueline L.; Field, Larry et al. | Journal of Accountancy, May 1994 | Go to article overview

Small Business


Babicky, Jacqueline L., Field, Larry, Pricher, C. Norman, Journal of Accountancy


Jacqueline L. Babicky, CPA, president, Babicky Consulting Group, Portland, Oregon.

The Portland area, where small businesses are the rule rather than the exception, is on the upswing. People are feeling good about themselves and are optimistic about the future. The types of businesses doing well here are those that have taken steps to differentiate themselves or their products from the mainstream. For instance, companies that have found a niche are doing particularly well.

Some companies have been able to keep their margins high either by carefully picking a product line or customer base. One of my clients was a wholesale computer distributor. When it tried to compete by offering a wide line of goods, it was forced to compete on a price basis. However, by offering special services to a small group of clients, it was able to raise margins and improve profitability.

The companies that seem to be having problems are those committed to traditional ways of doing business: those that have not looked at ways to refocus their businesses and eliminate unnecessary functions and that have not invested and retrained the work force.

More and more, CPAs are viewed as important business advisers rather than as auditors or reviewers of financial statements. Small businesses need CPAs who can help them make their operations more efficient. In companies I work with, CPAs are an integral part of the management team, responsible for forecasting, budgeting and planning.

Larry Field, CPA, partner, Field, Sarvas and King, P.C., Phoenix, Arizona.

The Phoenix region has become a small business mecca. We've witnessed a tremendous influx as small businesses relocate here because of our climate, social stability--even the lack of earthquakes. The population also is booming, so the residential real estate market is going great guns.

There are a few big businesses in the region--Phelps-Dodge and a few others--but our economy is focused primarily on smaller businesses. The service industry is very strong. As an Arizona CPA Society board member, I know firms have been rapidly expanding--everyone seems to be hiring--which isn't the case in other parts of the country.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Small Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.