My Sister Was So in Love with Scotland; EXCLUSIVE: ANGELIKA WAS HAPPIEST WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE HAPPY

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), October 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

My Sister Was So in Love with Scotland; EXCLUSIVE: ANGELIKA WAS HAPPIEST WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE HAPPY


Byline: By Joan Burnie

ANETA KLUK does not want people to think of Angelika only as the Polish student who came to Scotland and was murdered.

That fact alone does not define the person Angelika was.

She was also a loving sister and a devoted daughter to her dad Wladyslaw.

But she was so very much more to her, even than that.

And this is what Aneta wants us to understand about the beautiful, smiling, laughing girl who loved Scotland and the Scots so much.

She wants us to know not only what she has lost but what we have all lost.

As Aneta says: "She was so good, so sweet - always."

Aneta herself is a very private person who does not want her sister's very public death to become public property.

But she agreed to speak to the Record for two reasons. First, she needs to know who killed her little sister and why.

Until she gets those answers, she can't begin to mourn properly.

There are witnesses who still need to come forward to help complete the jigsaw, so that Aneta can bury her sister and comfort her dad.

Second, she wants Angelika to be remembered not for the mistruths some have focused on, but as a girl with a wide smile who was happiest when other people were happy - a girl who came to Scotland to live, not to die.

Aneta was five years old when Angelika was born. They shared a bed. They shared a life. They shared everything - except, perhaps, the bedclothes.

Aneta said: "She always complained that I was stealing her covers."

Under those covers, Aneta would make up stories because the fairytales in the books were neither adventurous nor exciting enough for Angelika.

Aneta added: "She didn't want to hear about little moles or birds.

"She wanted to hear of people who did fantastical things because Angelika wanted to do fantastical things herself."

And so she did. Angelika went to the University of Gdansk to study as a translator. She also wanted to be a writer.

She first came to Scotland two years ago, during the summer holidays, to help fund her studies and perfect her English.

She arrived in Edinburgh, knowing no one, with nowhere to stay and no job.

Aneta said: "That was Angelika. She knew it would be all right. I would have been too scared - but not Angelika.

"You see, she knew she would be OK because it was Scotland - not England, not London, but Scotland.

"We'd read about it. We had looked at photos and we felt at home because we are highland people as well. We come from a place with forests and hills. …

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