Health-Care Costs a Vexing Issue in Race; Gov. Sonny Perdue and Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor Are Brimming with Ideas

By Jones, Walter C. | The Florida Times Union, September 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

Health-Care Costs a Vexing Issue in Race; Gov. Sonny Perdue and Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor Are Brimming with Ideas


Jones, Walter C., The Florida Times Union


Byline: WALTER C. JONES

ATLANTA - The differences between Gov. Sonny Perdue and Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor on health care show, as much as anything, how different they are in how they view problems.

The cost and availability of health care is a nagging question for policymakers and voters. It has vexed these two politicians since they were first elected and will probably vex them until they're out of office.

It gobbles up more and more of the state budget and it's nearly always one of the top issues on voters' minds. So solving it is a priority for both.

But how?

For Perdue, he tends to embrace ideas in the Republican mainstream, even though he was first elected as a Democrat.

He championed "tort reform" legislation that limits how much patients can sue their doctors or hospitals for errors. He signed it into law because, he said, it would lower insurance premiums for health providers so they could pass along the savings to patients.

He signed a bill that allows insurance companies to offer plans that don't include mammograms, extensive mental-health coverage and other so-called mandates that the legislature required to be covered ordinarily when Democrats controlled state government.

Perdue also aimed to save taxpayers money on health care by restricting the eligibility for PeachCare, a government program to cover poor children. He toughened the rules on paying the modest PeachCare premiums, kicking off children whose parents were late paying.

And he shifted all of the state's health plans - for employees, retirees and those covered under Medicaid and PeachCare - to an HMO-type management program. Like a private health maintenance organization, the state plans would channel medical decisions toward supposed cost-efficient options.

When Perdue announced the shift, he laid out his reasoning.

"Georgia Healthy Families will give decision-making power and control to plan members, while at the same time stemming the spiraling costs of health care in Georgia," he said.

In announcing a campaign promise recently to stop taxing retirement income, the governor described it as a health plan of sorts.

"By eliminating taxes on their retirement income, seniors will have more money in their pockets to cover the costs of prescription drugs and health care or to spend more time with their grandchildren," he said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Health-Care Costs a Vexing Issue in Race; Gov. Sonny Perdue and Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor Are Brimming with Ideas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.