Book Reviews: Mike Ripley's Crime File

The Birmingham Post (England), October 7, 2006 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews: Mike Ripley's Crime File


Harry Hole sounds as if he could be a character in an old episode of Minder but in fact he is the Norwegian detective hero of a cracking good thriller called The Redbreast by Jo Nesbo (Harvill, pounds 11.99).

European crime novels in translation are all the rage at the moment and have a certain amount of snobbery attached to them, in that if it's translated it must be good. This is just not true' some recent ones have been absolute clunkers.

The Redbreast, though, is the genuine article. A fast-paced police hunt for a potential assassin, whose identity and target are both unknown quantities, conducted with dogged determination by the very human Inspector Hole, recently promoted to the Norwegian Security Service, the book becomes a real page-turner.

The novel also says a lot of uncomfortable things about right-wing politics in modern Norway as well as detailing the extent of Norwegian collaboration with the Nazis during the Second World War. Yet it is the character of Harry Hole (and his sadly doomed partner) which is the strength of the book. Here is a real police hero.

To use the word "epic" in the context of a crime novel is usually asking for trouble, but few would question it being applied to Vikram Chandra's Sacred Games (Faber, pounds 16.99) which clocks up 900 pages and weighs in at nearly three pounds.

Epic it is, though, in scale and scope and in the quality of the writing, which is superb, from the moment Inspector Sartaj Singh makes contact with gangster Ganesh Gaitonde on the day of his death.

Sartaj is the only Sikh inspector on the Mumbai police force and through him we not only get the gangster's story in flashback, but also a vivid picture of a teeming city where "the morgue is too small" and absolutely everybody is corrupt.

Sacred Games is a stunning novel and one of the best crime novels of the year, with Sartaj a wonderfully sympathetic hero whose philosophy is that the police are good men who have to be bad in order to keep the worst men under control. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews: Mike Ripley's Crime File
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.